UPDATE: Joe Maddon now permitted to wear hoodie

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Joe Maddon hoodie.jpgUPDATE: After “reinterpreting” the ruling, major league baseball will allow Joe Maddon to wear his hoodie, according to Marc Topkin of the St. Petersburg Times. It’s a victory for the little, err, casual people.

Monday, 5:43 PM: Rays’ manager Joe Maddon likes to wear a hoodie over his jersey — or more likely, over a t-shirt in lieu of a jersey. Major League Baseball has put the kibosh on that, however, telling him that the hoodie is not approved for on-field wear. Maddon said he’ll stop wearing the hoodie.

You might recall a couple of years ago baseball told Terry Francona that he needed to stop wearing that little short sleeve windbreaker he likes to wear. He still wears it, though.  How that’s approved while the hoodie isn’t, I have no idea. At least there’s a chance some impressionable consumers would buy a Rays’ hoodie after seeing Maddon in one.  I don’t know anyone who would wear Francona’s windbreaker. And it is all about commerce, isn’t it? Or am I being obtuse?

I think managers should be able to wear anything they want to. Maybe we’d get some style out of these guys.  Ask yourself, what looks better: this guy wearing the official uniform of Major League Baseball; or this handsome gentleman here?

Now that’s a hat you can set your watch to!

Report: White Sox acquire Yonder Alonso from Indians

Yonder Alonso
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The White Sox have reportedly picked up first baseman Yonder Alonso from the Indians, according to Stadium. The return for Alonso is expected to be nothing more flashy than a “fringe prospect,” though the minutiae of the deal is still pending a formal announcement from both teams.

Alonso, 31, inked a two-year deal with the Indians during the 2017 offseason. His first campaign with the club yielded a modest .250/.317/.421 batting line, 23 home runs, .738 OPS and 0.7 fWAR in 574 PA. The real boon for the White Sox may not be a passable veteran bat, however, but something more intangible — like Alonso’s clout with his brother-in-law and highly-coveted free agent slugger, Manny Machado.

While Alonso’s 2018 output represented a significant decline from the career-best numbers he posted in 2017, he’s still a solid contributor at the plate and, more importantly, slated to remain under team control for the next two years with just $8 million owed in 2019 and a $9 million option in 2020. As MLB.com’s Anthony Castrovince notes, the $17 million the Indians just erased from their payroll should give them enough room to accommodate the contracts for right-handers Trevor Bauer and Corey Kluber — a bonus regardless of what they happen to get in the trade.