Miguel Cabrera in some elite company at age 27

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Miguel Cabrera turned 27 years old yesterday and celebrated with his 212th career homer, which got me curious about where his production at his age ranks in baseball history.
After all, Cabrera was a full-time player for a World Series team at age 20, has played at least 155 games in every year since then, and has never hit fewer than 25 homers, driven in fewer than 100 runs, or batted below .290 in a full season.
He still has another 150 or so games to include in his “through age 27” production, but assuming he matches last year’s numbers (.324/.396/.547 with 34 homers and 103 RBIs) here’s where Cabrera would rank in various categories among players at the end of their age-27 seasons:
Games: 1,200 (20th)
Hits: 1,418 (12th)
Doubles: 287 (4th)
Homers: 243 (12th)
RBIs: 856 (10th)
Total Bases: 2,458 (9th)
Extra-Base Hits: 542 (10th)
Not bad, huh?
Cabrera may be overlooked at times because he’s never blasted 40 homers or finished higher than fourth in the MVP balloting–and certainly didn’t make any fans with his drunken arrest last October–but in terms of consistent excellence few hitters in baseball history can match him at this stage of their careers.
Today’s birthday boy isn’t bad either: Joe Mauer joins Cabrera at age 27 today and the reigning MVP already has more batting titles than every other catcher in baseball history combined. Also born in 1983? Zack Greinke, Jose Reyes, Hanley Ramirez, Justin Verlander, Nick Markakis, Dustin Pedroia, Ryan Braun, and Cole Hamels. Oh, and me (although my numbers through age 27 don’t compare so favorably).

Charlie Morton exits start with discomfort in right shoulder

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Astros pitcher Charlie Morton left Sunday’s start against the Angels after just one inning due to discomfort in his right shoulder, the team announced. Morton yielded a one-out double to Justin Upton, who later scored on a wild pitch. He averages about 96 MPH on his fastball but sat in the 92-94 MPH range in his one inning of work.

Morton, 34, went on the disabled list with right shoulder discomfort on August 29 and returned on September 8. It’s bad news for the Astros, who may have to go into the playoffs without him. If that is to be the case, Lance McCullers would take Morton’s spot in the rotation. It’s also bad news for Morton, who is a free agent after the season and figures to be one of the more sought-after starters.

Morton entered Sunday’s start 15-3 with a 3.15 ERA with a 195/63 K/BB ratio in 163 innings of work.