Ubaldo Jiminez had electric stuff last night

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Ubaldo Jimiez no hitter.jpgMatthew wrote about it first last night, but I just got done watching the replay of the Ubaldo Jiminez no-hitter, and I have to say that it’s been a long time since I’ve seen someone pitch with that kind of gas in his tank. He struggled a bit early walking people, but it seemed like the reason for it was he just had so much power and velocity and so much action on his fastball that he couldn’t fully harness it.

After a couple of innings he tired ever so slightly, settled in at an, um, reasonable 97-98 miles per hour, and he was much better able to control the extra giddy-up. By the time the sixth and seventh innings rolled around the Braves had no better shot at
hitting the ball than you or I would have had.  I loved Jiminez before, but after last night’s performance the guy is approaching man-crush territory. I mean, he was no-hitting my team, and all I could think was how awesome it was.

I was also thinking that the Braves get no-hit a lot because watching them flail certainly felt familiar.  Turns out, though, that it’s only happened twice since I was converted to their cause in the mid 80s: last night and Randy Johnson’s perfect game in 2004 (there were 11 other occasions before the 1980s).  I guess the feeling was just a function of seeing a lot of bad offensive nights against guys throwing serious heat, which is an occupational hazard for Bobby Cox teams.

MLB calls umpire union statement about Manny Machado discipline “inappropriate”

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Earlier today the Major League Baseball Umpire’s Association made multiple posts on social media registering its displeasure at what it feels was the league’s weak discipline of Manny Machado following his run-in with umpire Bill Welke. It was an unusual statement, as it’s not common for umpires, individual or via their union to comment on such matters.

This evening, in an official statement, the league called it inappropriate:

“Manny Machado was suspended by MLB Chief Baseball Officer Joe Torre, who considered all the facts and circumstances of Machado’s conduct, including precedent, in determining the appropriate level of discipline.  Mr. Machado is appealing his suspension and we do not believe it is appropriate for the union representing Major League Umpires to comment on the discipline of players represented by the Players Association, just as it would not be appropriate for the Players Association to comment on disciplinary decisions made with respect to umpires.  We also believe it is inappropriate to compare this incident to the extraordinarily serious issue of workplace violence.”

That final bit, about workplace violence, is something that I didn’t really consider when I read the umps’ statements, but it’s a damn good point. In an age where people are literally shooting up workplaces, umpires making reference to that kind of thing in response to a player throwing a bat is pretty rich indeed. And in pretty poor taste.