Quote of the Day: Bud Selig

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“Hank Aaron told me, ‘We never got out of the batter’s box.’ And Joe
Torre told me the same thing. You watch guys now. They’re in the
batter’s box and it’s ball one. Then they get out and they’re adjusting
everything. I said to the committee, ‘What are they adjusting? They
didn’t swing.'”

Commissioner Bud Selig in an interview with the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, discussing the pace of the game. He added “We live in a fast-paced society. The game ought to be played the way
it’s always been played. You watch a 2-1 game and that ought not to take
3 hours and 4 minutes.”  I can’t argue with that. I also can’t argue with the fact that it’s much better to hear this from the Commissioner of Baseball than from some loose cannon umpire.

One question, though: does Selig really need to name-check Aaron and Torre on this? Bud’s been around a while so I’m sure he knows that guys didn’t use to step out all the time. Heck, they didn’t do it even 20 years ago.  At the risk of totally irresponsible armchair psychology — my favorite kind, by the way — this quote is a window into Selig’s insecurity. He’s the freakin’ head honcho of baseball, but he doesn’t feel confident enough in his role to simply state something obvious with authority. Instead, he invokes the names of two guys who he believes have much more weight and credibility than he himself does, likely believing on some level that his opinion wouldn’t matter otherwise.

Such behavior creates a self-fulfilling prophecy. Bud hasn’t taken many strong stands on his own. Instead, he has let public opinion dictate the courses he takes. This is just the latest example.

Dustin Pedroia going back on injured list

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Welp, that didn’t last long. Red Sox second baseman Dustin Pedroia is going back on the injured list with more knee issues. If it matters the Sox say it’s not a big deal and they expect him back sooner rather than later, but they also said that his post-2017 knee surgery was just a “cleanup” at first and that basically cost him a year. So.

Pedroia has played in six games and is 2-for-20 with a walk.

I don’t think it’s hyperbole to say that Pedroia’s career may be nearing an end. Sure, he’s under contract for two more years after this season, but he’s also in a unfortunate spiral that so many players experience in their mid-to-late 30s.

Running a website like this makes it all the clearer, actually. When you search a player’s name in our CMS, you get every post in which he appears in reverse chronological order. Just about every long-tenured player ends with about six posts in which he is alternately placed on and activated from the disabled/injured list. Then an offseason link to a big feature in which he’s written about as being “at a crossroads” followed by something vague about “resuming baseball activities” and then, inevitably, the retirement announcement. I can’t count the number of guys whose careers I can tick off in that way by browsing the guts of this site.

I hope that’s not the case for Pedroia. I hope that there’s a “Pedroia wins Comeback Player of the Year” post in the future. Or at the very least a silly “Miller’s Crossing” reference in an “And that Happened” in which I say “the old man’s still an artist with the Thompson” after he peppers the ball around in some 3-for-4, two-double game. I want that stuff to happen.

It’s just that, if you watch this game long enough, you realize how unlikely that is once a player starts to break down.