Strasburg, Chapman deliver in openers

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UPDATE: Strasburg allowed four runs — one earned — over five innings and tallied eight strikeouts against two walks.  According to the AP he was clocked consistently in the 97-98 MPH range. 

Chapman tossed 4 2/3 innings down in Louisville, fanning nine batters and allowing one earned run on five hits.  The Cincinnati Enquirer’s John Fay says four of those hits were infield singles.  Not a bad start for both.

12:53pm: Baseball fans, listen up.  Young pitching prospects Stephen Strasburg and Aroldis Chapman are scheduled to make their 2010 minor league debuts this afternoon and MLB.com will be streaming both appearances.  For Free.

The pitchers are both scheduled to take the mound at 2 PM ET.  Strasburg will be dealing for the Nationals’ Double-A affiliate in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, while Chapman will be handling his business for the Reds’ Triple-A affiliate, the Louisville Bats.

Strasburg, 21, signed a $15.1 million contract last year after being selected No. 1 overall in baseball’s first-year player draft.  Chapman signed a $25 million free agent contract this offseason.

He gone! Hawk Harrelson called his last game yesterday

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Ken Harrelson has been broadcasting for decades but yesterday was his last one. As of today the Hawk has hung up his mic and entered retirement. He gone!

Harrelson, 77, who played in the majors for nine seasons with the A’s, Red Sox, Indians and Senators and led the AL in RBI in 1968. He was also the White Sox’ general manager for a single season in the mid-80s. That didn’t go well — he famously fired Tony La Russa and Dave Dombrowski and traded away a young Bobby Bonilla, but his career as a broadcaster went swimmingly.

Harrelson served as a Red Sox broadcaster from 1975 through 1981. Despite his reputation as an unrepentant homer for his White Sox — who he called “the good guys,” as opposed to the “bad guys” playing them — he was actually fired as a Red Sox broadcaster for being critical of ownership. He then embarked on his first stint with the White Sox before his move into the front office, worked as a Yankees broadcaster from 1987-88 and worked games for NBC’s Game of the Week in the mid-1980s as well. He then returned to call games for the White Sox in 1990 and the rest is history.

Hawk will still be a team ambassador for Chicago so he not totally gone, but the White Sox broadcast booth is entering a new era.