Ozzie Guillen is very worked up about the White Sox's strikeouts

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Through three games the White Sox’s offense has scored 12 runs while batting .154, and manager Ozzie Guillen is already threatening changes after the lineup combined for 12 strikeouts last night:

When we built this club, I didn’t want people to strike out, and we did too much. If they continue to strike out like that, then we find another approach. With the ball club we have, we can’t be striking out like that. … And they can say whatever they want to say–good pitching, cold weather, whatever it is. Too many strikeouts.



When you talk about this ball club, we can’t have the luxury to strike out with people on base. I think this ball club, we have to put the ball more in play, make things happen. … I’ve seen so many strikeouts with people on base. I know it’s the third game of the season and I know it’s cold, but we had too many strikeouts.

Fair enough, Ozzie, but what do you think of all the strikeouts?
Certainly no manager likes it when his team strikes out a dozen times in one game–and particularly a manager who had one of the lowest strikeout rates in baseball when he was a player–but the White Sox had a total of just six strikeouts in the first two games, have the fourth-fewest strikeouts in the league overall this season, and are actually the only team in the league with more walks than strikeouts right now.
In other words, imagine how worked up Guillen will get if the White Sox actually do start striking out a lot. Incidentally, when Guillen and the White Sox won the World Series in 2005 they had the sixth-most strikeouts in the league.

Report: Mariners enter into a ballpark naming rights deal with T-Mobile

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Maury Brown of Forbes reports that T-Mobile will be the new naming rights partner for the Seattle Mariners’ ballpark beginning in 2019. Their park had been known as Safeco Field since it first opened in the summer of 1999. The 20-year naming rights deal with Safeco ended with the close of the 2018 season.

Brown reports that the deal will be around $3 million a year, which doesn’t seem like a whole lot. Then again, I have long been skeptical of how much naming rights actually bring back to the naming rights partner. That’s especially true when the partner is slapping its name on a ballpark that was known as something else beforehand. People tend to still use the old name and, I suspect, resent the new one a bit. Maybe that’s less the case when the park has only been known by corporate names, and no beloved traditional name is being displaced, but I still question if anyone really makes a single purchasing decision based on the name of a ballpark.

I know this much for sure, though: despite the relatively small cost of naming rights here, none of the most notable Seattle-based companies — which include Amazon, Starbucks, Nordstrom, Microsoft, Costco and Alaska Airlines — felt it was worth it. Possibly because they know people are gonna call the place “Safeco” for several years regardless.