Nick Adenhart: One year later

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Nick Adenhart large.jpgOne year ago this morning we woke up to the news of Nick Adenhart’s death. As Lyle Spencer of MLB.com reports, the Angels are still working through it all. “The shock … I don’t think you ever get over the shock,” Jered Weaver said. “Any time you bring it up, it’s there.”

The Angels will award Weaver with the inaugural Nick Adenhart Award tonight, which will henceforth go to the team’s most valuable pitcher. And with that, the formal part of the grieving process will end. Gone will be the reminders that were everywhere last year: his
locker preserved in game-day condition. His jersey hanging in the
dugout. His number on the outfield wall.

Personally, I don’t do well with this sort of thing. I don’t mean death itself. I can deal with the actual death of someone close to me as well as someone can be expected to deal with it under the circumstances.

The hardest part for me is the expected and inevitable return to normalcy. When the person’s clothes and possessions are disposed of. When you change the entry in the address book from “Husband and Wife Smith” to merely “Wife Smith.” When you serve a meal and, for the first time, someone feels comfortable taking the dead person’s seat at the table. Those are the kinds of things that truly cause the loss to set in for me. They underscore the finality and, in some cases, tragedy of it all in ways that affect me far more than the initial moment of shock and the first few days and weeks of grieving do.

The Angels are now returning to normalcy. For those on the team closest to him, Nick Adenhart will necessarily transform from a source of raw, immediate and visceral inspiration to something different. And in some subtle but important ways, that may be harder to deal with than what they went through last year.

Phillies’ Bryce Harper to miss start of season after elbow surgery

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PHILADELPHIA – Phillies slugger Bryce Harper will miss the start of the 2023 season after he had reconstructive right elbow surgery.

The operation was performed by Dr. Neal ElAttrache in Los Angeles.

Harper is expected to return to Philadelphia’s lineup as the designated hitter by the All-Star break. He could be back in right field by the end of the season, according to the team.

The 30-year-old Harper suffered a small ulnar collateral ligament tear in his elbow in April. He last played right field at Miami on April 16. He had a platelet-rich plasma injection in May and shifted to designated hitter.

Harper met Nov. 14 with ElAttrache, who determined the tear did not heal on its own, necessitating surgery.

Even with the elbow injury, Harper led the Phillies to their first World Series since 2009, where they lost in six games to Houston. He hit .349 with six homers and 13 RBIs in 17 postseason games.

In late June, Harper suffered a broken thumb when he was hit by a pitch and was sidelined for two months. The two-time NL MVP still hit .286 with 18 homers and 65 RBIs for the season.

Harper left Washington and signed a 13-year, $330 million contract with the Phillies in 2019. A seven-time All-Star, Harper has 285 career home runs.

With Harper out, the Phillies could use Nick Castellanos and Kyle Schwarber at designated hitter. J.T. Realmuto also could serve as the DH when he needs a break from his catching duties.