UPDATE: Brewers agree to long-term contract with Yovani Gallardo

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UPDATE: Gallardo gets a five-year deal (including 2010) with a sixth-year team option, so the Brewers potentially bought out his first two seasons of free agency.
11:45 AM ET: Tom Haudricourt of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports that the Brewers “are believed to be closing in on contract extension” with Opening Day starter Yovani Gallardo.
Milwaukee has scheduled a press conference for this afternoon, presumably to announce the deal with Gallardo, who will be arbitration eligible for the first time next season and has three more years remaining under team control.
After missing most of 2008 with an ACL team in his right knee, Gallardo won 13 games with a 3.73 ERA and 204 strikeouts in 185.2 innings as a 23-year-old last season. His control was shaky with the second-most walks in the league at 94, but he also ranked second in strikeout rate and held opponents to a .219 batting average.
Gallardo had good control in the minors and walked just 45 batters in 134.1 innings before suffering the knee injury, so at age 24 he seems likely to take a big step forward this season. In other words, if the Brewers can pre-pay for his arbitration years and buy out a year or two of free agency before his value rises they’ll have taken a very smart risk.

Rangers turn the sort of triple play that has not been done in 106 years

Associated Press
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Triple plays are rare. Triple plays in which only two players touch the ball are even more rare. But last night the Texas Rangers turned a triple play that was even more rare than that. Indeed, it was the sort of triple play that had not been turned since a couple of months after the Titanic sank.

Here’s how it went down:

With the bases loaded and nobody out in the fourth inning, David Fletcher of the Angels hit a sharp one-hopper, fielded by third baseman Jurickson Profar. He stepped on third, getting the runner on second base in a force out. He then quickly tagged Taylor Ward, who had been on third base but had broken, thinking the ball was going to get through, and who froze before figuring out what to do. Profar then threw to Rougned Odor, who stepped on second to force the runner out who had been on first. Watch:

Like a lot of weird triple plays, not everyone was sure what had happened immediately. Odor, for example, had already made the third out when he touched the bag but he still attempted to tag out the runner from first, likely not yet having processed it all. The announcer wasn’t aware of it either. Understandable given how fast it all happened. It took me a couple of times watching it to figure it all out.

The historic part of it: according to STATS, Inc., it was the first triple play in 106 years in which the batter was not retired. The last time it happened: June 3, 1912, turned by the Brooklyn Dodgers against the Cincinnati Reds.