Scott Kazmir on track to return next week, but will his raw stuff come back?

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Scott Kazmir admitted to being “very surprised” by the Angels’ decision to place him on the disabled list with a sore shoulder. Instead of beginning the season in the rotation Kazmir threw 77 pitches in a minor-league game and reported afterward that he felt “real good.”
Kazmir is scheduled to start another minor-league game Friday and then expects to rejoin the Angels with a start against the Yankees next week. “No doubt in my mind,” Kazmir said. “I felt I was ready but, at the same time, I didn’t get that many innings [during spring training]. This just gives me more time to work on things.”
Hopefully he gets healthy, because I’m very curious to see how Kazmir fares in his first full season with the Angels. His raw stuff appeared to be on the decline while in Tampa Bay, but after the Rays traded Kazmir and the $24 million remaining on his contract to the Angels at midseason he turned things around, flashing increased velocity while posting a 1.73 ERA in six starts.
Kazmir led the league with 239 strikeouts as a 23-year-old in 2007, and while he’s still just 26 no longer seems to have that type of upside. His strikeouts per nine innings have gone from 10.4 to 9.8 to 7.1 in the past three seasons and last year batters made contact on 82 percent of their swings against him after previously never topping 76 percent. Kazmir also averaged a career-low 91.1 miles per hour with his fastball, which is one full mph lower than in 2007.

Scott Boras says it would be a conflict of interest for an agent to become a GM

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Earlier, Craig wrote about the latest in the Mets’ search for a new general manager. Their list has been pared down to three candidates: Chaim Bloom (Rays senior VP of baseball operations), Doug Melvin (Brewers senior advisor), and agent Brodie Van Wagenen (of Creative Artists Agency).

It’s a diverse list, for sure, which makes one wonder what process allowed them to arrive at these final three candidates. Bloom is new school, Melvin is older-school, and Van Wagenen is… just inexperienced. Van Wagenen in particular is an interesting candidate as he has spent years advocating on his clients’ behalf. As a GM, he would do the exact opposite: he would try to take advantage of his players whenever possible, like every other GM in baseball does (e.g. manipulating service time).

Per Mike Puma of the New York Post, agent Scott Boras thinks there would be a conflict of interest if an agent were to become a GM. Boras, in fact, says he has turned down opportunities to lead front offices. But there is no verbiage saying that an agent must divest himself of his business interests before taking a job in a front office. Dave Stewart and Jeff Moorad are two examples of agents who later went onto the ownership side of the business. Stewart, in fact, moved into the front office after retiring and held various roles in with various organizations until he started Sports Management Partners (renamed Stewart Management Partners). He transferred control of the agency to Dave Henderson before he joined the Diamondbacks’ front office near the end of the 2014 season.

Ownership and labor are in constant conflict, even when things seem peaceful. Ownership wants to extract as much labor as possible as cheaply as possible. Labor wants to be paid for their work as much as possible. Their goals contradict each other and yet they need each other. While not required, usually being deeply on one side or the other — as agents and GM’s are — speaks to one’s personal ethos about the eternal tug-of-war. That Van Wagenen is so eager to switch sides speaks, perhaps, to opportunism. I would be, at minimum, unsettled if I were a client of Wan Wagenen’s at CAA. How might he use the sensitive information he was privy to as an agent to his advantage as a GM?

We have seen the analytics wave take over front offices around baseball. As ownership looks for ever more ways to pocket more cash, Van Wagenen’s candidacy may signal an upcoming wave of agents transitioning into front office roles. Hopefully that doesn’t become the case. There may be no one better equipped to take advantage of labor than someone experienced on that side of the battlefield.