Should we just forget the search for a fifth starter?

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A lot of time has been spent trying to figure out who should be the fifth starter in New York, but if it were up to FanGraph’s Marc Hulet, we wouldn’t even be making the effort:

Teams spend millions of
dollars and thousands of hours crunching data to build a successful
five-man rotation, but it’s all in vain. The truth of the matter is that
these mythical creatures don’t actually exist. If we look back to the 2009 season, only two teams had five starters
on their pitching staffs that made 24 or more starts: the Chicago Cubs
and the Colorado Rockies.

Hulet has a better idea: rather than pick one guy to be the fifth man in the rotation, make it a committee affair, filling that fifth slot with a veteran long reliever who could make 8-10 starts, a young pitching prospect who can make 8-10 starts and split the season between the minors and the big club and fill the remainder of the starts with minor league veterans and organizational soldiers.

I like the thinking — don’t anoint anyone “fifth starter” and, rather, use that slot as a proving ground of sorts — but it just seems impractical for anyone but a rebuilding team.  The first time the young prospect gets a go and has a nice outing everyone will be clamoring for him to keep the job. The first time the swingman gets shelled everyone will wonder why a career long relief guy is starting games.

Hulet’s idea is a nice way to optimize resources and give multiple guys looks, but it overlooks the fact that managers get cameras and tape recorders shoved in their faces every single night and are expected to explain themselves. That’s stressful and distracting even if the skipper has the backing of the front office. Upshot: neat idea, but I think it’s ultimately unworkable.

Yankees halt Giancarlo Stanton’s rehab due to calf tightness

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There was some thought that Yankees outfielder Giancarlo Stanton would soon be activated from the injured list. Stanton has been out since the beginning of April due to biceps and shoulder injuries. It will be a little while longer.

The Yankees announced on Wednesday that Stanton’s rehab has been halted due to tightness in his left calf. Stanton was scratched from Tuesday’s rehab game with High-A Tampa due to tightness around his left calf and knee, so this news didn’t pop up out of nowhere.

Stanton recorded a pair of singles and seven walks in 15 trips to the plate in the only three games he played this season, all against the Orioles. Durability has always been a concern for the 29-year-old, but he managed to play in 159 games for the Marlins in 2017 and 158 for the Yankees last year. He’s in the fifth year of a 13-year, $325 million contract originally signed with the Marlins.