Why players can't own a piece of the team

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Employee owenrship.gifI’ve always known that players can’t hold equity stakes in their teams due to the Basic Agreement (see paragraph 4(c) on p. 213 of this massive document), but I never knew why.

Today, however, Kevin Goldstein of Baseball Prospectus explains. Once upon a time Rogers Hornsby got a cut of the Cardinals, was traded to the Giants, and quickly found his ownership stake to be a conflict of interest. And it got worst when he went to divest, as the Cardinals tried to lowball him, leading to everyone in the National League having to chip in to buy him off.  As a result of all of that, the rule was passed and has been incorporated into player contracts and/or the Basic Agreement ever since.

The only exception: players can take a stake in the team with special approval of the Commissioner.  Goldstein speculates whether or a team could give a chunk of the team to a player with language built in to deal with any Hornsby-esque conflicts of interest and have it approved by Selig. He dismisses it almost immediately, however, which is probably sensible given that it’s not likely to ever happen.

The only thing I’d add is the notion of maybe offering a player a chunk of a team — or at least the option to buy a chunk of the team — that doesn’t vest until retirement.  I kind of doubt that would ever happen, though, because it would require something akin to financial transparency for baseball teams and they really, really hate that.

Scooter Gennett to undergo MRI after injury

Scooter Gennett
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The Reds have sent second baseman Scooter Gennett in for an MRI exam after he was forced to make an early departure from Friday’s 6-4 loss to the Brewers. The exact nature of the injury has yet to be reported, but starting pitcher Robert Stephenson said Gennett may have hurt himself after he “rolled weird” while trying to rein in a ground ball. He appeared to be grabbing at his right thigh/groin area immediately afterward and was helped off the field.

Following the incident, the 28-year-old was swiftly replaced by veteran infielder Carlos Rivero, who went hitless as he finished out the game. Though Gennett went 0-for-1 in his lone at-bat on Friday, he’s been tearing through the Cactus League competition this spring with a .351/.405/.486 batting line in 42 plate appearances so far.

The extent of Gennett’s injuries have not been disclosed — and may still be unknown to the team as well — but any significant setback would undoubtedly throw a wrench in the Reds’ plans this season, as he was the presumed starter at the keystone after turning in his first All-Star worthy performance in 2018. Although they have a promising alternative in top infield/outfield prospect Nick Senzel, the 23-year-old has not seen any time at second base this year and was recently reassigned to Triple-A Louisville to start the 2019 season.