Gardner, not Winn, likely to start for Yankees

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According to Bryan Hoch of MLB.com “all indications” are that Brett Gardner will be the Yankees’ starting left fielder, with veteran free agent pickup Randy Winn “serving more of a fourth outfielder’s role.”
When the Yankees signed Winn in January the opposite was thought to be true, but manager Joe Girardi said yesterday that Gardner “is a guy that we think has the ability to play every day and we think he has to show it.”
Gardner has hit just .256 with a .325 on-base percentage and .352 slugging percentage through 150 games as a major leaguer after batting .280/.391/.385 in 143 games at Triple-A, so his offense will be well below par at a position where the MLB average was .270/.341/.440 in 2009.
However, he figures to be an elite defensive left fielder and also brings a ton of speed to the table, swiping 39 bases in 425 plate appearances with the Yankees and 53 bases per 600 plate appearances in the minors. Which is why Gardner was among my favorite fantasy sleepers for AL-only leagues even before apparently moving past Winn on the depth chart.

Behold: The new Marlins logo

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The Marlins have not released their new uniform design — at least not yet — but they did release their new logo today. That’s it up top. It’s not too bad? Here’s the secondary logo, which you could maybe imagine on a cap?

The logo appears at the end of the video below which is, until the final few seconds, not about baseball at all. It’s about Miami. A “this is our town” promotional thing which takes you on a tour and shows you people and the culture of the city.

A lot of times when sports teams do this stuff it seems somewhat contrived, but I think it’s pretty cool here. The Marlins have almost never sent much of a “we are a part of our community” message. Jeff Loria lived in New York for Pete’s sake and, of course, they infamously consider themselves a foreign corporation for legal purposes. Before this, the most they ever seemed to want out of Miami is tax subsidies and to be left the hell alone.

You can’t just market your way into a community — and the Marlins have a long way to go before they can earn back any sort of trust from baseball fans in Miami —  but the fact that they are at least trying to make themselves part of the Miami community is probably worth something.

Anyway: