Tracy Ringolsby accuses Rangers of a "cover-up"

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A less-than-intellectually-inspired Tracy Ringlosby column today about Ron Washington
and the Rangers [I’ve deleted Ringolsby’s unnecessary paragraph breaks
because I think readability is more important than faux drama]:

Washington is an engaging personality. He has developed a strong bond
with the Rangers players in his three years on the job. He’s even won
over most of the critics he once faced in the Dallas-Fort Worth media
because of his straightforward approach. But some things can’t be
ignored. Washington crossed that line last July when he dabbled with
cocaine. Washington and the Rangers tried to cover it up. They could
not, however, hide it forever. And it finally came out on Wednesday . .
. Face it, there was enough concern over what Washington did that the
manager and the team tried to hide it. They were exposed this week and
tried to put on a happy face. It’s called whistling in the dark.

Was this really a “cover-up”?  Because from where I’m sitting, it was a
situation in which an employee’s drug test results were kept in-house.
Which is exactly what should be done with employee drug tests. Indeed, model
federal drug-free workplace guidelines
set forth pretty strict
confidentiality rules for this sort of thing absent express written
consent by the employee to the contrary (which is why PED results are released for players).  For their part, the Rangers
can do whatever they want with this stuff, but I’m guessing that they
don’t have an “issue press release when drug test results come back”
policy. Nor should they.

But hey, maybe Ringolsby has a point here. To prove it, I’m going to go
ask FOX and whatever bankruptcy receiver has possession of the Rocky
Mountain News’ old files for copies of Ringolsby’s employee drug tests
dating back to, oh, 1978 or so.  I’ll let you know if I get them. Or if,
as was the case with Ron Washington, a cover-up is afoot.

RHP Fairbanks, Rays agree to 3-year, $12 million contract

tampa bay rays
Dave Nelson/USA TODAY Sports
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ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Reliever Pete Fairbanks and the Tampa Bay Rays avoided arbitration when they agreed Friday to a three-year, $12 million contract that could be worth up to $24.6 million over four seasons.

The deal includes salaries of $3,666,666 this year and $3,666,667 in each of the next two seasons. The Rays have a $7 million option for 2026 with a $1 million buyout.

His 2024 and 2025 salaries could increase by $300,000 each based on games finished in the previous season: $150,000 each for 35 and 40.

Tampa Bay’s option price could increase by up to $6 million, including $4 million for appearances: $1 million each for 60 and 70 in 2025; $500,000 for 125 from 2023-25 and $1 million each for 135, 150 and 165 from 2023-25. The option price could increase by $2 million for games finished in 2025: $500,000 each for 25, 30, 35 and 40.

Fairbanks also has a $500,000 award bonus for winning the Hoffman/Rivera reliever of the year award and $200,000 for finishing second or third.

The 29-year-old right-hander is 11-10 with a 2.98 ERA and 15 saves in 111 appearances, with all but two of the outings coming out of the bullpen since being acquired by the Rays from the Texas Rangers in July 2019.

Fairbanks was 0-0 with a 1.13 ERA in 24 appearances last year after beginning the season on the 60-day injured list with a right lat strain.

Fairbanks made his 2022 debut on July 17 and tied for the team lead with eight saves despite being sidelined more than three months. In addition, he is 0-0 with a 3.60 ERA in 12 career postseason appearances, all with Tampa Bay.

He had asked for a raise from $714,400 to $1.9 million when proposed arbitration salaries were exchanged Jan. 13, and the Rays had offered for $1.5 million.

Fairbanks’ agreement was announced two days after left-hander Jeffrey Springs agreed to a $31 million, four-year contract with Tampa Bay that could be worth $65.75 million over five seasons.

Tampa Bay remains scheduled for hearings with right-handers Jason Adam and Ryan Thompson, left-hander Colin Poche, third baseman Yandy Diaz and outfielder Harold Ramirez.