The A's in San Jose: what's it gonna be, Bud?

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So Bud Selig appointed a committee to study the intricacies of maybe possibly hopefully hypothetically moving the Athletics to San Jose.  The problem: the Giants’ territorial rights.  I’m not expert of decision making, but it strikes me that Bud’s committee had to answer a relatively small, relatively simple few questions: (1) Are the A’s viable in Oakland; (2) If no, would the A’s be better off in San Jose; (3) if yes, what is to be done about the San Francisco Giants’ territorial rights.

Easy questions? Not necessarily, but not utter killers either. I think it’s safe to assume that the answer to (1) is no, at least given the realities of Lew Wolff’s ownership and what the people involved are willing to do as opposed to all that is possible to save baseball in Oakland.  From there it’s easy to say that (2) is “yes,” and to the extent there is any specter of doubt in San Jose it’s the San Jose government’s problem, not baseball’s. At least not yet.  That leaves (3), which is how best to buy off the Giants.  Tricky? Sure, but you out a handful of folks in a conference room for an afternoon you can come away with four or five bullet points on how best to attack the problem.

Which makes me wonder why it has taken a year of studying the matter, yet still no report.  At least that’s Bud’s story.  As the Chronicle’s John Shea points out, however, Oakland officials — specifically Mayor Ron Dellums —  said the report is done and that Selig has seen it.  But still, no word from the Commissioner on what they’re gonna do with the Athletics.

One year. The Allied powers figured out how the post-war partition of Europe was going to go down in less time. The Bretton Woods conference established the system that kept financial order for 60 years in less time. It didn’t take too much more than a year to get a man in space after the formation of NASA.  You’d think that a handful of people could figure out how to properly dispose of a baseball team in that time frame. 

Kyle Gibson, Orioles finalize 1-year, $10M contract

Bill Streicher-USA TODAY Sports
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SAN DIEGO – Right-hander Kyle Gibson and the Baltimore Orioles finalized a one-year, $10 million contract.

The 35-year-old would receive a $150,000 assignment bonus if traded, payable by the receiving team. He also can earn a $25,000 bonus if he is elected or selected for the All-Star team. Gibson was an All-Star in 2021.

Gibson was 10-8 with a 5.05 ERA in 31 starts for Philadelphia last season. He also pitched 2 1/3 scoreless innings in two relief appearances in the postseason for the NL champions.

Baltimore gained another experienced arm as it looks to build on its surprising season. After losing 110 games the previous year, the Orioles contended for an AL wild card for much of the summer before finishing 83-79 for the franchise’s first winning record since 2016.

Gibson was an AL All-Star in 2021, going 6-3 with a 2.87 ERA in 19 starts for Texas. He was traded to Philadelphia that July, and he went 4-6 with a 5.09 ERA in 12 appearances for the Phillies down the stretch.

The 6-foot-6 Gibson was selected by Minnesota in the first round of the 2009 amateur draft. He made his big league debut with the Twins in 2013.

He spent his first first seven seasons with Minnesota, going 67-68 with a 4.52 ERA in 193 games, including 188 starts. He had his best year in 2018, finishing with a career-low 3.62 ERA in a career-best 196 2/3 innings.

Gibson, who signed a $28 million, three-year contract with Texas in December 2019, is 89-91 with a 4.52 ERA in 267 major league games.