Did the Royals just cut their second best reliever?

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It’s still pretty early on in the spring for notable cuts, but one from Tuesday will force me to revise my projections a bit, as the Royals optioned right-hander Carlos Rosa to Triple-A.
Now, I’m sure most won’t care about such a move. Rosa was, at best, going to be a setup man for one of the worst teams in baseball. He was regarded as one of the Royals’ best prospects at one time, but that changed due to injuries that eventually led to his conversion from a starter into a reliever.
Rosa, though, showed some real promise while working out of the pen last year. Here’s the writeup I gave him for the Rotoworld draft guide:

Instead of signing Kyle Farnsworth and Juan Cruz to multi-year deals, maybe the Royals should have just given Rosa a chance to win a job out of spring training last year. The right-hander, who was one possibility to go to the Marlins for Mike Jacobs before Leo Nunez was traded instead, didn’t have an exceptional Triple-A ERA in his first year as a reliever, but he fanned 80 batters and allowed just six homers in 71 innings in the Pacific Coast League. The Royals finally called him up in September and he picked up a save in his season debut on his way to amassing a 3.38 ERA in 10 2/3 innings. Rosa works at 93-96 mph as a reliever, and along with his hard slider, he still uses the average changeup he honed as a starter. The package should make him a nice setup man, perhaps right from the start of 2010. He definitely deserves the opportunity to overtake Farnsworth and Cruz.

Of course, there’s no real harm in the Royals’ decision to send Rosa down for a few weeks in order to take a longer look at Rule 5 pick Edgar Osuna and some guys who are out of options. It’s not like a handful of innings in April are going to make the difference in whether they reach the postseason. It’s just that it’s disappointing how rarely talent seems to win out in Kansas City.

MLB, union resume blood testing after pandemic, lockout

Scott Taetsch-USA TODAY Sports
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NEW YORK – In the first acknowledgment that MLB and the players’ association resumed blood testing for human growth hormone, the organizations said none of the 1,027 samples taken during the 2022 season tested positive.

HGH testing stopped in 2021 because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Testing also was halted during the 99-day lockout that ended in mid-March, and there were supply chain issues due to COVID-19 and additional caution in testing due to coronavirus protocols.

The annual public report is issued by Thomas M. Martin, independent program administrator of MLB’s joint drug prevention and treatment program. In an announcement accompanying Thursday’s report, MLB and the union said test processing is moving form the INRS Laboratory in Quebec, Canada, to the UCLA Laboratory in California.

MLB tests for HGH using dried blood spot testing, which was a change that was agreed to during bargaining last winter. There were far fewer samples taken in 2022 compared to 2019, when there were 2,287 samples were collected – none positive.

Beyond HGH testing, 9,011 urine samples were collected in the year ending with the 2022 World Series, up from 8,436 in the previous year but down from 9,332 in 2019. And therapeutic use exemptions for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder dropped for the ninth straight year, with just 72 exemptions in 2022.

Overall, the league issued six suspensions in 2022 for performance-enhancing substances: three for Boldenone (outfielder/first baseman Danny Santana, pitcher Richard Rodriguez and infielder Jose Rondon, all free agents, for 80 games apiece); one each for Clomiphene (Milwaukee catcher Pedro Severino for 80 games), Clostebol (San Diego shortstop Fernando Tatis Jr. for 80 games) and Stanozolol (Milwaukee pitcher J.C. Mejia for 80 games).

There was an additional positive test for the banned stimulant Clobenzorex. A first positive test for a banned stimulant results in follow-up testing with no suspension.