Deep Thoughts: Derek Jeter's predecessors

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Mike Vaccaro has a column today about how the presence of Derek Jeter and his presumptive multi-year deal likely contributed to the Yankees missing out on Cuban free agent Adeiny Hechevarria, who seems to have signed with the Blue Jays. Vaccaro is realistic about it — it’s not like you let 19 year-old prospects dictate what you do with your still-elite Hall of Fame shortstop — it’s just one of them things, ya know?

The column did make me think, however, about the position for the Bombers. Specifically, I tried to think of who, exactly, was manning shortstop before Jeter took over full time in 1996. I recalled Tony Fernandez had the position in 1995, but before that it was a total blank.  I held out as long as a I could before consulting Baseball-Reference.com, but ultimately I couldn’t get past Fernandez.

Anyway, just for “oh wow” sake, here is the list of the guys who manned shortstop for the Yankees between the Bucky Dent and Derek Jeter eras, in reverse chronological order: Fernandez, Mike Gallego, Spike Owen, Andy Stankiewicz, Alvaro Espinoza — who actually held the job for three years! — Rafael Santana, Wayne Tolleson, Bob Meacham, Roy Smalley and then back to Dent.

There are new prospects every year. Anchors at shortstop are pretty damn rare.

Ichiro wore a fake mustache to sneak into the Mariners’ dugout

Associated Press
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Ichiro Suzuki is now a Mariners employee and, as such, he’s not allowed to sit in the dugout during a game. That’s for coaches and players only.

He knows that, too. Indeed, on the day Ichiro announced his sorta-retirement, he talked about how it was going to be hard not to be down on the field with the other players. He even made a ridiculous joke about how, “[he] can’t say for certain that maybe [he] won’t put on a beard and glasses and be like Bobby Valentine and be in the dugout.”

In related news, this mysterious stranger was seen by an Associated Press photographer in the Mariners dugout during the first couple of innings of the M’s-Yankees game:

(AP Photo/Bill Kostroun)

No beard, but I guess that joke was not very ridiculous after all. Either way, by the end of the second inning — poof — he was gone.

Obviously, when something interesting like this happens you mustache an expert for their opinion on the matter. To that end, the Associated Press reached Bobby Valentine, who famously did the same thing after an ejection way back in 1999, for comment:

“He was perfect. I never would have known it was him.”

Valentine was suspended for two games and fined $5,000. I’m assuming Ichiro won’t get hit quite as hard given that he wasn’t defying an umpire’s authority, but even if he does have to pay a fine, he’ll likely do so willingly.