J.C. Romero being sued for alleged altercation with fan

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J.C. Romero headshot.jpgWe originally mentioned this last June, but now J.C. Romero is being sued by the fan who accused him of assault.

Robert Eaton, 26, has filed a lawsuit claiming that Romero caused him “serious and permanent injury” by allegedly hitting him in the neck when he was asking for an autograph. Eaton recalls getting the pitcher’s attention by saying, “How about you get me some juice?” Of course, Romero served a 50-game suspension for violating MLB’s performance-enhancing drug policy, so it’s possible he didn’t take too kindly to the joke, but charges were never pursued on the Phillies left-hander because of conflicting reports from witnesses.

Eaton, who said the assault left him with three herniated disks in his neck, is seeking in excess of $15,000 in damages.

On the pitching side of things, Romero is working his way back from offseason surgery on his elbow. He has yet to face live hitters, leaving the chances of him being ready for the start of the season in doubt.

Minor League Baseball eclipses 40 million in attendance for 14th consecutive season

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Minor League Baseball announced on Wednesday that, for the 14th consecutive season, the league has eclipsed 40 million in total attendance. 20 teams set single-game attendance records and seven teams set franchise records for single-game attendance in their current parks.

ESPN’s Keith Law, who has been covering the minor leagues for quite a while, did the math:

Minor League Baseball president and CEO Pat O’Conner, whose most prominent stint in the public eye involved him disingenuously justifying the underpaying of his players, said, “Minor League Baseball continues to be the best entertainment value in sports, and these numbers support that. For us to top 40 million fans for the 14th consecutive season despite the weather challenges our teams faced in April and May is a testament to the continued support of our loyal fan bases and the creative promotions and hard work done by all of our teams across the country.”

Major and Minor League Baseball are quite happy to make money hand over fist on the backs of their players, but are too cheap to pay them adequately for their labor.