Topps defends its monopoly

Leave a comment

Carl Yaz with the sideburns.jpgThe story about the MLB-Upper Deck settlement this morning led a lot of people — even those who aren’t big fans of Upper Deck cards — to lament the fact that baseball has seen fit to give one company a monopoly over the baseball card racket.  It’s a good point because monopolies, as a rule, suck.

Good timing then, that the website The Baseball Card Attic interviewed Topps about this recently:

You are the exclusive baseball card manufacturer for MLB, is this monopoly good for fans and the baseball card dealers’?

MLB felt that the best way to get rid of the clutter and simplify the message to baseball fans and collectors was to go exclusive with one manufacturer. There were too many products on the shelf and it was becoming difficult for consumers, especially kids, to understand trading cards. In the long term it will benefit all, because we can get back to a more common language of collecting trading cards and the stores will see new collectors because of the hobby’s back to basics mentality.

I’ll admit that I grew confused over the multiple — and often weird — products that showed up on the card market over the past 15-20 years or so, but I also admit that I’m an old, blind nostalgic fogey when it comes to cards. 

If the “confusion” the Topps guy mentions was really a problem in the market, I assume that it would have meant for crappy sales of baseball cards.  The fact that companies like Upper Deck competed like mad to stay in the good graces of MLB — in Upper Deck’s case, going so far as to risk a devastating lawsuit — suggests that consumers were doing just fine with things the way they were.

Clayton Kershaw might return to the Dodgers’ rotation next week

AP Images
Leave a comment

Dodgers southpaw Clayton Kershaw is nearing his return to the mound, according to club manager Dave Roberts. Both Kershaw (left biceps tendinitis) and fellow lefty Rich Hill (left middle finger blister) are scheduled to toss simulated games on Saturday; depending on the outcome, Roberts says Kershaw could forgo a minor league assignment and slot back into the rotation by Thursday.

Kershaw, 30, was diagnosed with biceps tendinitis as the team closed out their Mexico Series at the start of the month. He has not made a start in several weeks, but was finally able to resume throwing on Sunday and managed to get through two successful bullpen sessions. Though Dodgers’ ace hasn’t been completely injury-free over his 11-year career in the majors, this is the first significant issue he’s had with his pitching arm so far. The team is expected to take every precaution with the lefty, and will likely limit him to just four innings during Saturday’s simulated game.

Prior to his injury, Kershaw was working on another dominant run with the club, sporting a 2.86 ERA, 2.0 BB/9 and 9.8 SO/9 through his first 44 innings of the season. While Kershaw, Hill and left-handed starter Hyun-Jin Ryu served their respective terms on the disabled list this month, the Dodgers utilized a combination of relievers Ross Stripling and Brock Stewart, both of whom impressed during their limited time in the rotation.