The Cubs get a little more stat-friendly

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Paul Sullivan of the Tribune reports that the Cubs are broadening their minds:

New Chairman Tom Ricketts told fans at the Cubs Convention he
expects the organization to use sabermetrics as a tool more often for
player decisions and evaluating opponents while still valuing the human
component. The Cubs didn’t hire a full-time numbers cruncher until Chuck
Wasserstrom was named manager of baseball information after the 2003
season.

“We’ve always done more than people thought,” Hendry said. “… We’ve
always factored that in. But I’m always going to be a scouting guy
first. You can skew statistics to frame it the way you like it.

That Hendry quote is pretty ridiculous. Sure, you can try to spin numbers any way you want, but at some point the spin becomes implausible because at the end of the day there’s still, you know, a number there.  Scouting, in contrast, can lend itself to far, far more subjectivity because, ultimately, a scout’s assessment is a person’s opinion. An informed one, yes, if the scout is well-trained, but an opinion all the same. 

Here’s a far more interesting quote from Sullivan, which seems to be an attempt to take a swipe at statistical analysis:

According to the numbers, Hendry seemed to make the right moves when he signed free agents Milton Bradley and Aaron Miles last year. Bradley led the American League in OBPS (on-base plus slugging percentage) with the Rangers in 2008,
while Miles hit .392 in day games with the Cardinals, which made him a
perfect fit for a team that plays more day games than any other. But both flopped badly with the Cubs.

Setting aside the fact that I’ve never seen OPS referred to as “OBPS,” anyone who suggests that reckless sabermetrics led to the Bradley and Miles flops is full of beans.

Sabermetrics is about more than on base percentage. Smart sabermetricians were extremely wary of the Cubs signing Bradley due to the fact that he had played so little in the field while in Texas. They acknowledged his upside, sure, because Bradley is talented and has upside, but they also acknowledged the extreme risk he represented from both a health and character perspective and thought that the Cubs massively overpaid for his services.

Only the truly moronic think that scouting and sabermetrics
are mutually-exclusive evaluation tools. Almost every team uses both
scouting and stats, as they should.

Video: Rhys Hoskins gets revenge against Jacob Rhame with homer, slooooow trot

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Wednesday night’s Phillies-Mets game did not feature any beanballs or benches-clearing brawls, but it did feature Rhys Hoskins getting his revenge against Jacob Rhame. Last night, Rhame threw a fastball up-and-in at Hoskins. Rhame maintained his innocence, though Hoskins was skeptical.

Hoskins got a chance for revenge against Rhame in the ninth inning with the Phillies already ahead 4-0. Bryce Harper drew a leadoff walk. Hoskins then worked a 1-1 count before drilling a 95 MPH fastball over the left field fence for a two-run home run. Hoskins milked his accomplishment, taking a 34-second stroll around the bases. For a point of comparison, MLB.com’s Anthony DiComo notes that noted speedster Bartolo Colón had a 30.5-second trot around the bases after homering in 2016. MLB.com’s Todd Zolecki notes that Hoskins’ longest home run trot prior to this was clocked at 28.88 seconds. Wednesday’s trot was the first this season above 30 seconds across the league.

The dinger is Hoskins’ seventh of the season. He also walked and tripled in Wednesday’s 6-0 win. On the season, Hoskins is now batting .273/.402/.580 with 20 RBI and 18 runs scored in 107 plate appearances.