"Steroids made me superhuman"

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USA Today collects some comments from five of the ten still-active Mitchell Report All-Stars.  The most interesting quote comes from Matt Herges, who is clearly not part of the “steroids just help me stay in the lineup” camp:

“I know what steroids did for me. It made me
superhuman,” Herges said. “It made me an android, basically. Your body
shuts down, and the stuff takes over. You had guys throwing harder than
95 mph when they had barely touched 90 mph their whole life. It wasn’t
just that but the strength, the confidence it did for you. “The confidence, the feel, the results, is mentally addictive. It’s habit-forming to say the least.”

People always point to the offensive explosion of the Steroid Era, but I’ve always wondered if it wasn’t the relief pitchers like Herges who benefited the most from PEDs. They’re the closest thing to sprinters in baseball, doing one thing — throwing fire — in shorter bursts than anyone else on the field, and I suspect they more than anyone else would benefit from added chemical strength.  Hitters still have to have good timing and a good eye. Starters need more stamina and a more nuanced mental approach given that they gotta face guys two or three times. With most relievers, gas makes the difference.

I won’t name the name because I’ve never seen him attached to steroids in print, but there was a Braves reliever who showed up one year in the bad old days throwing the ball approximately 249 miles per hour faster than he ever had earlier in his career. With each pitch I wondered whether his arm or the hitters’ bats would explode first. Turns out the arm did, but not after an uncharacteristically large number of strikeouts.  Maybe it was steroids, maybe it wasn’t, but he certainly demonstrated what added velocity can do for a guy who makes his living one inning at a time.

John Gibbons will close out the year as Blue Jays skipper

John Gibbons
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Blue Jays manager John Gibbons is slated to remain with the club through the end of the 2018 season, general manager Ross Atkins told reporters on Friday. The news follows a report from Ken Rosenthal of FOX Sports, who cast some doubt on the veteran skipper’s future with the team several weeks ago when he said the Jays “seem destined to move on from John Gibbons.”

While it appears Gibbons’ job is safe for the next six weeks, that’s not saying much — especially as the club currently sits 30.5 games back of the division lead and will prepare to continue restructuring a sub-.500 roster come fall. As recently as last week, he hinted that he wasn’t feeling particularly eager to oversee a full rebuild. Per Rob Longley of the Toronto Sun:

Truthfully, a full breakdown, you know I have to admit I don’t know if I’m interested in that,” Gibbons said prior to Friday’s 7-0 blowout loss to the Tampa Rays. “But we’ll see. I’m still here. I’ve enjoyed every minute of it.

Over 11 cumulative seasons from 2004-2008 and 2013-2018, the 56-year-old manager has guided the team to a winning record just five times, most recently when they earned back-to-back playoff appearances in 2015 and 2016. He still has another year remaining on his contract, which was recently lengthened to include the 2018 and 2019 seasons and includes an option for 2020 as well.

Atkins also revealed that the club is prepared to reevaluate Gibbons’ role during the offseason, though it’s not yet clear whether they intend to keep him on for the next two years as originally planned, reassign him to another role within the organization, or terminate his agreement with the team altogether.