Which "Wire" character is Omar Minaya?

Leave a comment

You can get straight-up baseball analysis anywhere, but only a handful of websites ask the things I really want to know. Questions like, “if Omar Minaya were a character from ‘The Wire,’ who would he be?”

You know who I think it is, it’s Pryzbylewski.
Prezbo is clearly a guy, like Omar as a GM, who is thrown into a
certain situation. Prezbo was in the police department where everything
lines up for him to be there, but maybe it’s not the best situation for
him. Like Prezbo was better off at school, maybe Minaya should be on
the sidelines as a scout–head of scouting–because he gets a deer in the
headlights look as GM. He makes some silly signings, like Prezbo shoots
a cop accidentally. I think that’s it. That’s my on the spot answer.

Of course Prezbo went on to be a competent teacher, and I’m struggling to think what Omar would do in civilian life as it were.

But it’s an interesting question, not just for Minaya, but for other baseball figures as well.  Jay at Fack Youk — who tipped me to the above — thinks that Minaya is more of a Herc figure. I think that works better.  He also thinks that Brian Cashman is Stringer Bell.  There’s merit to that too.

I’ll add a couple: I imagine we can all agree that Scott Boras is Clay Davis: totally full of crap and shady as hell, but basically bulletproof as he rakes in the dough. Tony La Russa is Bunny Colvin: the cop who legalized drugs on his beat, realized great success as a result, but had a lot of heat come down later.

I’m sure you guys can think of some other examples. 

Adrian Gonzalez plans to play next season

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Bob Nightengale reports that Adrian Gonzalez plans to play in 2019 and the Diamondbacks are “one of the teams who may have interest.”

Well, now that they’ve traded way Paul Goldschmidt I suppose they have an opening.

The Mets released Gonzalez on June 10, after he completed a 54-game tenure with a batting line of .237/.299/.373 and only six homers. No one else showed interest in the five-time All-Star after the Mets cast him off and, as such, one might have felt comfortable saying that his playing days were over. He thinks differently, however, and apparently the Dbacks are at least willing to listen. He will turn 37 in May and will almost certainly have to settle for a minor league contract, but if the man wants to play, that will not be an obstacle.