Great Moments in cultural elitism

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Jon Heyman this morning:

lengthy discussion in starbucks now by 2 people regarding their love of hooters’ wings. i gotta get back to NY!

Anyone want to tell Heyman that there’s a Hooters on W. 56th Steet?

But I don’t mean to single out Heyman. Tim Lincecum likes to mock those with different tastes as well:

He’s a fan of the People of Wal-Mart Web site, and if you’ve ever
seen it, you probably feel a lot better about your ability to dress
yourself in the morning.

Lincecum and a buddy made a run to the local big-box retailer
yesterday and he was very pleased with the photo of himself out front,
smiling while making a “W” symbol with his hand. He submitted it to the
site and hopes to see himself soon.

I’m not trying to be the thought police here, but having grown up in places that many people consider to be less than culturally sophisticated, I get really tired of this kind of casual, mocking cultural elitism. Hooters and Wal-Mart patrons buy baseball tickets and copies of Sports Illustrated too. Many of them — even those whose photographs were taken without their knowledge while they were looking less than their best and then were posted on some website — are actually pretty darn nice people if you get to know them.

If you don’t like Hooters don’t eat there (I’m not a fan myself). If you’re gonna hate on Wal-Mart, hate the fact that their executives have are largely responsible for getting this country hooked on crappy, cheap, disposable imported consumer
products and for ruining the Kansas City Royals.

But lay off their customers, will ya?  Not all of them are worth eight figures or can afford to live next door to Pudge Rodriguez. They’re doing the best they can.

Minor League Baseball eclipses 40 million in attendance for 14th consecutive season

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Minor League Baseball announced on Wednesday that, for the 14th consecutive season, the league has eclipsed 40 million in total attendance. 20 teams set single-game attendance records and seven teams set franchise records for single-game attendance in their current parks.

ESPN’s Keith Law, who has been covering the minor leagues for quite a while, did the math:

Minor League Baseball president and CEO Pat O’Conner, whose most prominent stint in the public eye involved him disingenuously justifying the underpaying of his players, said, “Minor League Baseball continues to be the best entertainment value in sports, and these numbers support that. For us to top 40 million fans for the 14th consecutive season despite the weather challenges our teams faced in April and May is a testament to the continued support of our loyal fan bases and the creative promotions and hard work done by all of our teams across the country.”

Major and Minor League Baseball are quite happy to make money hand over fist on the backs of their players, but are too cheap to pay them adequately for their labor.