MLB to begin testing minor leaguers for HGH

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One day after I pondered whether baseball would react in an ignorant, knee-jerk fashion to that positive HGH test by that British rugby player,  the New York Times reports that baseball plans react in an ignorant, knee-jerk fashion to that positive HGH test by that British rugby player:

Major League Baseball, which had long been skeptical about a viable
test for human growth hormone, now plans to implement blood testing for
the substance in the minor leagues later this year, according to an
official in baseball with direct knowledge of the matter . . .

. . . The decision to move ahead with blood testing comes one day after a British rugby player was suspended for testing positive for H.G.H. It was the first time
that an athlete had been publicly identified for testing positive for
the substance and was seen as overdue proof that the blood test, which
has been in limited use for six years, actually works.  In a statement in response to questions from The New York Times, Major
League Baseball said it was “well aware of the important news with
respect to” the positive drug test of the British athlete.

As the professor quoted at the end of the article notes, this test has been around for several years, and they’ve caught one dude with it. Does that not suggest to baseball — and anyone else with half a brain — that the test is prone to giving false negatives? I mean, it’s not like it’s reasonable to think that one random British prop is the only guy on the stuff. But hey, if the Daily News is pumping up a single positive, why shouldn’t Major League Baseball and everyone else go all-in?  Sheesh.

But hey, every other thing baseball has done with respect to PED testing has been PR, as opposed to science-driven, so why change now?

(thanks to reader Jeffrey S. for the heads up)

He gone! Hawk Harrelson called his last game yesterday

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Ken Harrelson has been broadcasting for decades but yesterday was his last one. As of today the Hawk has hung up his mic and entered retirement. He gone!

Harrelson, 77, who played in the majors for nine seasons with the A’s, Red Sox, Indians and Senators and led the AL in RBI in 1968. He was also the White Sox’ general manager for a single season in the mid-80s. That didn’t go well — he famously fired Tony La Russa and Dave Dombrowski and traded away a young Bobby Bonilla, but his career as a broadcaster went swimmingly.

Harrelson served as a Red Sox broadcaster from 1975 through 1981. Despite his reputation as an unrepentant homer for his White Sox — who he called “the good guys,” as opposed to the “bad guys” playing them — he was actually fired as a Red Sox broadcaster for being critical of ownership. He then embarked on his first stint with the White Sox before his move into the front office, worked as a Yankees broadcaster from 1987-88 and worked games for NBC’s Game of the Week in the mid-1980s as well. He then returned to call games for the White Sox in 1990 and the rest is history.

Hawk will still be a team ambassador for Chicago so he not totally gone, but the White Sox broadcast booth is entering a new era.