Clayton Kershaw wants to chuck the pitch count

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Clayton Kershaw stretch.jpgLike most young hurlers, the Dodgers’ Clayton Kershaw is subject to a pitch count. He’d prefer that he not be:

“This year I don’t think there should be that 100-pitch thing. If there was a
pitch count last year, I think this year there should be no
restrictions, no holds barred, I should pitch as long as I can. That’s
what I’m hoping for. That’s just what I feel.”

Rick Honeycutt said that the Dodgers would not “take the gloves off.”  Which, given that Kershaw is 21 years old, is the wise move given recent history. You gotta monitor and limit the workload of young arms.

Still, I agree with Kershaw on one point, and that’s the arbitrary nature of a 100 pitch count in and of itself.  The point should be to not let pitchers get fatigued or overworked, as people who study this stuff suspect that throwing on a tired arm — thus messing with mechanics and muscles and labrums and things — is when the real damage is done.  Isn’t it entirely possible that the fatigue point can come at pitch 79 on a particular afternoon? And that some days a guy is free and easy at 105 or 110?

Maybe this is way easier said than done, but if I had a young horse like Kershaw I’d devote someone — maybe my bench coach; they don’t seem to do anything — to become an expert in his mechanics, tells for fatigue and that sort of thing rather than simply relying on the automatic 100-pitches-and-you’re-out rule that has come to pervade the thinking on this subject.

Diamondbacks, T.J. McFarland avoid arbitration

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Bob Nightengale of USA TODAY Sports reports that the Diamondbacks and reliever T.J. McFarland have avoided arbitration, agreeing on a $1.45 million salary for the 2019 season. McFarland, in his third of four years of arbitration eligibility, filed for $1.675 million while the Diamondbacks countered at $1.275 million. McFarland ended up settling for just under the midpoint of those two figures.

McFarland, 29, was terrific out of the bullpen for the D-Backs last season, finishing with a 2.00 ERA and a 42/22 K/BB ratio in 72 innings. While the lefty may not miss a lot of bats, he does induce quite a few grounders. His 67.9 percent ground ball rate last season was the third highest among relievers with at least 50 innings, trailing only Brad Ziegler (71.1%) and Scott Alexander (70.6%).

McFarland was dominant against left-handed hitters, limiting them to a .388 OPS last season, but the D-Backs deployed him nearly twice as often against right-handed hitters, who posted an aggregate .764 OPS against him. It will be interesting to see if the club decides to use him more as a platoon reliever in 2019.