Clayton Kershaw wants to chuck the pitch count

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Clayton Kershaw stretch.jpgLike most young hurlers, the Dodgers’ Clayton Kershaw is subject to a pitch count. He’d prefer that he not be:

“This year I don’t think there should be that 100-pitch thing. If there was a
pitch count last year, I think this year there should be no
restrictions, no holds barred, I should pitch as long as I can. That’s
what I’m hoping for. That’s just what I feel.”

Rick Honeycutt said that the Dodgers would not “take the gloves off.”  Which, given that Kershaw is 21 years old, is the wise move given recent history. You gotta monitor and limit the workload of young arms.

Still, I agree with Kershaw on one point, and that’s the arbitrary nature of a 100 pitch count in and of itself.  The point should be to not let pitchers get fatigued or overworked, as people who study this stuff suspect that throwing on a tired arm — thus messing with mechanics and muscles and labrums and things — is when the real damage is done.  Isn’t it entirely possible that the fatigue point can come at pitch 79 on a particular afternoon? And that some days a guy is free and easy at 105 or 110?

Maybe this is way easier said than done, but if I had a young horse like Kershaw I’d devote someone — maybe my bench coach; they don’t seem to do anything — to become an expert in his mechanics, tells for fatigue and that sort of thing rather than simply relying on the automatic 100-pitches-and-you’re-out rule that has come to pervade the thinking on this subject.

Bradley Zimmer to miss 8-12 months after shoulder surgery

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Indians outfielder Bradley Zimmer is out for the year after undergoing arthroscopic surgery on his right shoulder, the team announced Saturday. The projected recovery timetable spans anywhere from 8-12 months, which puts Zimmer’s return in the second half of the 2019 season, assuming that all goes well.

Zimmer, 25, had not made an appearance for the Indians since June 3. He racked up a cumulative nine weeks on the major- and minor-league disabled lists this season and will have finished his year with a .226/.281/.330 batting line, seven extra-base hits, and four stolen bases in 114 plate appearances.

The outfielder reportedly sustained his season-ending injury during a workout in Triple-A Columbus, where Cleveland.com’s Joe Noga says Zimmer began feeling discomfort in his shoulder after completing a set of one-handed throwing drills. Comments from club manager Terry Francona suggest that the Indians have every reason to believe that he’ll make a full recovery by next summer, though it’s not yet clear whether or not he’ll need additional time to readjust to a full workload when he takes the field again.