The Dodgers expect you to pay twice the price for half the product

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The L.A. Times’ Bill Shaikin reports that a document setting forth the Dodgers’ financial plans was leaked in connection with the McCourt divorce. The document, which was created by the Dodgers in order to solicit Chinese investors in the team and/or a soccer club Frank McCourt wants to buy, sets out the following:

  • The Dodgers anticipate their revenue to rise from from $295 million in 2008 to $529 million in 2018;
  • Anticipate their average ticket price to rise from $29.40 in 2007 to $53.50 in 2018; and
  • Anticipate their payroll to rise from $123 million in 2008 to . . . $125 million in 2018.

Projecting anything out 8-10 years is something of a fool’s game, but even if those exact numbers don’t come to pass, a Frank McCourt-owned Dodgers team at least intends to nearly double ticket prices, nearly double revenue and keep payroll flat as a pancake over the next decade. For comparison, the Dodgers’ 1998 payroll was a shade over $61 million. If they had stuck to a similar plan starting then, today the Dodgers would have roughly the same payroll as the Oakland Athletics.

With the exception of some amount of deferred money, Manny Ramirez falls off after this season, so there is some room to grow to get “back” to the $125 million range. But you have to replace his production at some price. And, at the very least, plan for massive raises to Matt Kemp and Clayton Kershaw going forward. How that gets done — while addressing other needs and accounting for the inevitable inflation in player salaries — is unclear to say the least. 

Unless of course the Dodgers’ plan is to charge twice the price for half the product and still expect people to keep showing up at the ballpark.

Phillies’ Bryce Harper to miss start of season after elbow surgery

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PHILADELPHIA – Phillies slugger Bryce Harper will miss the start of the 2023 season after he had reconstructive right elbow surgery.

The operation was performed by Dr. Neal ElAttrache in Los Angeles.

Harper is expected to return to Philadelphia’s lineup as the designated hitter by the All-Star break. He could be back in right field by the end of the season, according to the team.

The 30-year-old Harper suffered a small ulnar collateral ligament tear in his elbow in April. He last played right field at Miami on April 16. He had a platelet-rich plasma injection in May and shifted to designated hitter.

Harper met Nov. 14 with ElAttrache, who determined the tear did not heal on its own, necessitating surgery.

Even with the elbow injury, Harper led the Phillies to their first World Series since 2009, where they lost in six games to Houston. He hit .349 with six homers and 13 RBIs in 17 postseason games.

In late June, Harper suffered a broken thumb when he was hit by a pitch and was sidelined for two months. The two-time NL MVP still hit .286 with 18 homers and 65 RBIs for the season.

Harper left Washington and signed a 13-year, $330 million contract with the Phillies in 2019. A seven-time All-Star, Harper has 285 career home runs.

With Harper out, the Phillies could use Nick Castellanos and Kyle Schwarber at designated hitter. J.T. Realmuto also could serve as the DH when he needs a break from his catching duties.