Quote of the Day: Dustin Pedroia

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Some reporters asked Dustin Pedroia if the Red Sox have transformed from a team built to score runs into a team built to prevent runs. I’ve never been a big Pedroia fan, but his response has shot my man-crush for him to dangerously high levels:

“I don’t even buy into that stuff. We have great pitching, we have
great defense, and we have good offensive players. I don’t
even know what run prevention is. I’m a baseball player. I don’t know
how to read very good; I don’t know how to write very good. We just go
play, man. That’s it. We’ll be fine.”

Pedroia is a ballplayer. He plays ball. He has no obligation to give a very obviously hungry Boston press corps. some quotes designed to serve the “do the Red Sox have enough offense?” narrative they’ve decided will dominate this spring. You can hit and play defense at the same time, and there’s every reason to think that the Red Sox will do just that. Screw the Boston press and their false, newspaper-selling dichotomies.

(thanks to Wooden U. Lykteneau for the heads up)

Minor League Baseball eclipses 40 million in attendance for 14th consecutive season

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Minor League Baseball announced on Wednesday that, for the 14th consecutive season, the league has eclipsed 40 million in total attendance. 20 teams set single-game attendance records and seven teams set franchise records for single-game attendance in their current parks.

ESPN’s Keith Law, who has been covering the minor leagues for quite a while, did the math:

Minor League Baseball president and CEO Pat O’Conner, whose most prominent stint in the public eye involved him disingenuously justifying the underpaying of his players, said, “Minor League Baseball continues to be the best entertainment value in sports, and these numbers support that. For us to top 40 million fans for the 14th consecutive season despite the weather challenges our teams faced in April and May is a testament to the continued support of our loyal fan bases and the creative promotions and hard work done by all of our teams across the country.”

Major and Minor League Baseball are quite happy to make money hand over fist on the backs of their players, but are too cheap to pay them adequately for their labor.