2010 projected leaders: Second baseman OPS

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Over the next several days, I’ll be dipping into my 2010 projections and presenting some leaderboards.
1. Chase Utley – 899
2. Robinson Cano – 860
3. Ian Kinsler – 846
4. Dustin Pedroia – 845
5. Ben Zobrist – 828
6. Dan Uggla – 822
7. Aaron Hill – 816
8. Howie Kendrick – 812
9. Kelly Johnson – 812
10. Brandon Phillips – 801
– While I’m rather down on Utley as a fantasy second baseman, he’s easily the class of the group when it comes to real baseball. I have him leading second baseman in OBP and one point behind Cano for the top slugging percentage.
– Brian Roberts misses out on a spot, even though he’s cleared 800 three straight seasons. I’m guessing his slugging percentage will fall off from what was the second-highest mark of his career last season. I have him at .279/.361/.424.
– I have 11 second basemen projected to slug .450 or better. 10 are listed above. The 11th is Jose Lopez, who doesn’t make the list because of a .318 projected on-base percentage.

Yadier Molina ties record for the most games caught with one team

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Yadier Molina has two World Series rings, multiple Gold Gloves, Platinum Gloves, All-Star appearances and a Silver Slugger award. He now has an all-time record too.

The record: the most games caught with one team. Last night he caught his 1756th career game with the Cardinals, with ties him with Gabby Hartnett of the Cubs, who last caught in 1941 and set the record in 1940, his last season with Chicago. Molina will break the record next time he dons the tools of ignorance, likely tonight against the Phillies.

Given how badly catchers get beaten up — and Molina has taken a beating at times in his career — and given how well mastery of the position leads to a catcher earning journeyman status, as it were, it’s quite a thing to catch that many games for one team.

Given that Molina is under contract with the Cardinals for two more seasons and has stated his desire to retire a Cardinal many times, he’s likely to put that record so far out of reach that it’ll likely take at least another 78 years to break it, if indeed it is ever broken.