Carlos Zambrano is the only Cub not allowed to have a meltdown

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The Chicago Tribune’s Dan McNeil is no fan of Carlos Zambrano. After railing against his contract and going on about how he’s no Ted Lilly, McNeil predicts a Big-Z meltdown:

Put me down for the first week in May for not-so-Big Z’s first
implosion. Not sure if it will be getting tossed for undressing an
umpire or pulling up lame trying to stretch a double, but an eruption
is a certainty. Until the man-child proves he’s as right between the
ears as he is in the hips, I’m betting against the Cubs getting this
cat’s potential actualized.

I think the richest thing about this is how he uses Ted Lilly of all people to demonstrate just how awful Carlos Zambrano is, because Lilly is no stranger to drama himself.

No wait, that’s not the richest thing. The richest thing is that just last summer McNeil wrote that the Cubs’ biggest problem was that Lou Piniella was acting all calm and professional instead of being a combative jackass:

Unearthing bases. Kicking dirt. Spitting. Scratching.
Fighting one of his own players, as he did in Cincinnati with the
behemoth-sized Rob Dibble.

None of those outlandish behaviors will solve the Cubs’ most urgent
problems, but when a historically fiery manager ceases to breathe fire,
then you have a brand new problem to tack onto the list: resignation.

To sum up: you can get away with acting like a jerk if you’re Ted Lilly. You can not only get away with being a jerk but you damn well better be a jerk if you’re Lou Piniella. But Lord help you do those things and your name is Carlos Zambrano.

Blue Jays call up Cavan Biggio

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Cavan Biggio, son of Hall of Famer Craig Biggio, has been called up by the Toronto Blue Jays.

Biggio, 24, was a fifth round selection in the 2016 draft. So far this year he has put up a .307/.445/.504 batting line with six home runs and five steals Triple-A Buffalo. He’s a utility guy of sorts, having spent time at first, second, third and all three outfield positions so far this year. He, perhaps ironically, has not caught yet in his pro career, nor does he play short. Still, that kind of flexibility in a young player can be pretty useful in this age of big bullpens. Especially if he continues to rake like he has. He’ll likely mostly play second base for the Jays starting out.

With Vlad Guerrero Jr. playing third base every day, Toronto now has two sons of Hall of Famers on their roster. That’s pretty neat.