Carlos Zambrano is the only Cub not allowed to have a meltdown

Leave a comment

The Chicago Tribune’s Dan McNeil is no fan of Carlos Zambrano. After railing against his contract and going on about how he’s no Ted Lilly, McNeil predicts a Big-Z meltdown:

Put me down for the first week in May for not-so-Big Z’s first
implosion. Not sure if it will be getting tossed for undressing an
umpire or pulling up lame trying to stretch a double, but an eruption
is a certainty. Until the man-child proves he’s as right between the
ears as he is in the hips, I’m betting against the Cubs getting this
cat’s potential actualized.

I think the richest thing about this is how he uses Ted Lilly of all people to demonstrate just how awful Carlos Zambrano is, because Lilly is no stranger to drama himself.

No wait, that’s not the richest thing. The richest thing is that just last summer McNeil wrote that the Cubs’ biggest problem was that Lou Piniella was acting all calm and professional instead of being a combative jackass:

Unearthing bases. Kicking dirt. Spitting. Scratching.
Fighting one of his own players, as he did in Cincinnati with the
behemoth-sized Rob Dibble.

None of those outlandish behaviors will solve the Cubs’ most urgent
problems, but when a historically fiery manager ceases to breathe fire,
then you have a brand new problem to tack onto the list: resignation.

To sum up: you can get away with acting like a jerk if you’re Ted Lilly. You can not only get away with being a jerk but you damn well better be a jerk if you’re Lou Piniella. But Lord help you do those things and your name is Carlos Zambrano.

Video: White Sox turn triple play against Astros

Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images
1 Comment

White Sox starter Iván Nova was able to escape a jam in the third inning of Wednesday night’s game against the Astros with the help of a triple play. Nova had allowed a leadoff double to Tony Kemp, then hit Robinson Chirinos with a pitch to put runners on first and second base with no outs. Facing Jake Marisnick in a 1-1 count, Nova threw a 94 MPH fastball that Marisnick sharply grounded to Yoán Moncada right at the third base bag. Moncada quickly fired the ball to Yolmer Sánchez at second base, then Sánchez whipped the ball to José Abreu at first base just ahead of a lunging Marisnick to complete the triple-killing.

According to Baseball Almanac, it’s the 718th known triple play dating back to 1876. The last time the White Sox turned a triple play was 2016. They turned three triple plays that season, amusingly. The Astros have been victimized by two of the last three triple plays, having also hit into one on April 19 last year against the Mariners.