The Mets are getting proactive on the injury front

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Recent controversy and this morning’s rumor notwithstanding, there is some good news to report on the Mets’ injury front: they’re trying new things to prevent more of them from happening:

When Mets players walked into the major-league clubhouse here for the
first time Thursday, there were large signs posted in the clubhouse
that read: “Prevention and recovery.”

It is more than just a hopeful slogan.

The Mets are modifying their training program this spring in an
effort to avoid a repeat of the injury-filled disaster of 2009. A team
spokesman told The Star-Ledger that the signs are meant to reinforce
what will be a bigger focus on baseball-related activities and more of
an emphasis on “rest and recovery.”

Players will be urged to save their energy for the field and not
exert themselves too much in the weight room. The emphasis will be more
on baseball skills, agility and flexibility than on building strength.

I’m no doctor, trainer or physical therapist, and thus I have no idea if the sorts of changes described here would have helped prevent the injuries to Jose Reyes, Carlos Beltran, Carlos Delgado and the others, but after the year they had in 2009, any change is probably for the best.

Report: White Sox acquire Yonder Alonso from Indians

Yonder Alonso
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The White Sox have reportedly picked up first baseman Yonder Alonso from the Indians, according to Stadium. The return for Alonso is expected to be nothing more flashy than a “fringe prospect,” though the minutiae of the deal is still pending a formal announcement from both teams.

Alonso, 31, inked a two-year deal with the Indians during the 2017 offseason. His first campaign with the club yielded a modest .250/.317/.421 batting line, 23 home runs, .738 OPS and 0.7 fWAR in 574 PA. The real boon for the White Sox may not be a passable veteran bat, however, but something more intangible — like Alonso’s clout with his brother-in-law and highly-coveted free agent slugger, Manny Machado.

While Alonso’s 2018 output represented a significant decline from the career-best numbers he posted in 2017, he’s still a solid contributor at the plate and, more importantly, slated to remain under team control for the next two years with just $8 million owed in 2019 and a $9 million option in 2020. As MLB.com’s Anthony Castrovince notes, the $17 million the Indians just erased from their payroll should give them enough room to accommodate the contracts for right-handers Trevor Bauer and Corey Kluber — a bonus regardless of what they happen to get in the trade.