Dayton Moore loves cliches, still doesn't get it

Leave a comment

Royals pitchers and catchers reported to spring training this morning and general manager Dayton Moore had this to say about the team’s offseason moves:

I love the moves that we’ve made this offseason. We wanted to get more athletic, and we wanted more team speed. Guys who could play better defense. And for a little over $8 million, we’ve added Chris Getz, Josh Fields, Rick [Ankiel], Scott Podsednik, Jason Kendall, Noel Arguelles and Brian Anderson.



All of those guys are very athletic and defensive-oriented players. They’re baseball players in the sense that they come to play. They’re winners. They’ve got great reputations in the game of being competitors. We like the moves a great deal.

I’m certainly not going to fault a GM for saying that he likes his own offseason moves, but all that other stuff is mostly nonsense and similar to what we’ve heard from Moore each spring since he got the job in 2006.
– “We wanted to get more athletic, and we wanted more team speed.”
– “They’re baseball players in the sense that they come to play.”
– “They’re winners.”
– “They’ve got great reputations in the game of being competitors.”
Just to be clear, he’s talking about Jason Kendall, Scott Podsednik, Rick Ankiel, Chris Getz, Brian Anderson, and Josh Fields. Meanwhile, he seems not to care a whole lot about getting on base or hitting for power, and doesn’t seem to realize that all those cliches about supposed intangibles don’t really matter when the team is terrible.
Kansas City has averaged 99 losses per season since their last winning record in 2003, and I can assure you that not having enough speedy, athletic winners who come to play and are competitors hasn’t been the problem.

Fan hit by foul ball during Sunday’s Rockies-Dodgers game

Harry How/Getty Images
2 Comments

Another fan was struck by a line drive foul ball during Sunday’s game between the Rockies and Dodgers at Dodger Stadium, Mike DiGiovanna and Jorge Castillo of the Los Angeles Times report. The ball was hit by Cody Bellinger in the first inning, going just beyond where the protective netting ends at the first-base dugout, striking a young woman in the head. Play was delayed for two minutes while the woman received medical attention. She initially stayed in her seat holding an ice pack to her head but was taken to a hospital for evaluation. According to someone in the Dodger Stadium first-aid office, the girl was alert and responding.

After the game, Bellinger said, “It was weird. It’s the first time I think I’ve hit a fan. I saw it literally hit her face. That was tough. I just tried to regroup. I’m sure it was tough for everyone.” He added, “I went over the next half-inning just to make sure she was all right. She said she was all right. She gave me a thumbs up. Obviously, it’s a scary situation.”

Both Bellinger and manager Dave Roberts expressed support for extending the protective netting at Dodger Stadium. [Update: Netting will be extended, Bill Plunkett of the Orange County Register reports.]

Bellinger was involved in yet another incident involving a fan later in the game. According to Michael Duarte of NBC Los Angeles, a 14-year-old girl ran on the field in the ninth inning. Bellinger said the girl came up to him and said, “I want a hug.” As she hugged Bellinger, a security guard tackled her. Bellinger said to her, “You know you’re going to jail?” She replied, “Yeah, I know. It was worth it.”