Why did Felipe Lopez and Kendry Morales leave their agents?

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As was reported over the weekend, Felipe Lopez fired his agent, Scott Boras, and Kendry Morales fired his agents, the Hendricks brothers . . . and joined up with Scott Boras.  The whys of these sorts of things are always a bit murky, but SI’s Jon Heyman explains in consecutive bullet points in his latest column:

• Kendry Morales had a financial dispute with Randy and Alan Hendricks before leaving them for Scott Boras. Morales is the one who brought Chapman to the Hendricks brothers so there was quite a turn for the worse in their relationship.

• Felipe Lopez was obviously frustrated not to find a starting job from among 30 teams after hitting .310 with a .383 on-base percentage, which led to his switch from Boras to the Beverly Hills Sports Council.

The stuff about Morales is new, as I’ve not seen anyone else report why he left the Hendricks brothers.  The Lopez stuff — the “starting job from among 30 teams” language — is not so new. Yes, I’m sure I’ve heard it before. Where was it . .  . where was it . . . Oh yeah, those were Scott Boras’ words:

“We know how frustrating it is when a player can’t get a starting job from any one of the 30 teams,” Boras says. “We wish Felipe well. He’s a very talented player.”

Query: does Lopez agree that he “couldn’t get” a job “from any of the 30 teams” or does he think his agent didn’t shop him effectively?  Inquiring minds want to know.

In any event, I find it interesting that Heyman is able to dig into the muck of a player-agent financial dispute so quickly in the case of Morales, while in the case of Lopez he is left with parroting the defensive and self-serving statement of the fired agent.

Unless of course both of those pieces of information came from the same place. Then it’s interesting for other reasons.

Ichiro wore a fake mustache to sneak into the Mariners’ dugout

Associated Press
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Ichiro Suzuki is now a Mariners employee and, as such, he’s not allowed to sit in the dugout during a game. That’s for coaches and players only.

He knows that, too. Indeed, on the day Ichiro announced his sorta-retirement, he talked about how it was going to be hard not to be down on the field with the other players. He even made a ridiculous joke about how, “[he] can’t say for certain that maybe [he] won’t put on a beard and glasses and be like Bobby Valentine and be in the dugout.”

In related news, this mysterious stranger was seen by an Associated Press photographer in the Mariners dugout during the first couple of innings of the M’s-Yankees game:

(AP Photo/Bill Kostroun)

No beard, but I guess that joke was not very ridiculous after all. Either way, by the end of the second inning — poof — he was gone.

Obviously, when something interesting like this happens you mustache an expert for their opinion on the matter. To that end, the Associated Press reached Bobby Valentine, who famously did the same thing after an ejection way back in 1999, for comment:

“He was perfect. I never would have known it was him.”

Valentine was suspended for two games and fined $5,000. I’m assuming Ichiro won’t get hit quite as hard given that he wasn’t defying an umpire’s authority, but even if he does have to pay a fine, he’ll likely do so willingly.