2010 projected leaders: On-base percentage

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Over the next several days, I’ll be dipping into my 2010 projections and presenting some leaderboards.
OBP
1. Albert Pujols – .443
2. Joe Mauer – .420
3. Todd Helton – .417
4. Manny Ramirez – .409
5. Prince Fielder – .406
6. Hanley Ramirez – .403
7. Matt Holliday – .403
8. Lance Berkman – .403
9. Chipper Jones – .400
10. David Wright – .398
11. Nick Johnson – .397
12. J.D. Drew – .396
13. Alex Rodriguez – .394
14. Kevin Youkilis – .393
15. Mark Teixeira – .392
16. Miguel Cabrera – .391
17. Brad Hawpe – .391
18. Adrian Gonzalez – .391
19. Chase Utley – .390
20. Nick Markakis – .388
21. Conor Jackson – .385
22. Milton Bradley – .385
23. Dustin Pedroia – .383
24. Bobby Abreu – .381
25. Adam Dunn – .378
– There are three Yankees and three Red Sox in the top 25, but oddly enough, nine of the top 10 here are National Leaguers.
– The Rays aren’t represented, even though they had Ben Zobrist at .405 and Jason Bartlett at .389 last year. My top Ray is Carlos Pena at .370, followed closely by Evan Longoria (.369). B.J. Upton, Zobrist and Carl Crawford are also in the .360s.
– The Giants’ had baseball’s worst OBP at .309 last year (Seattle, at .314, was next to last). After Pablo Sandoval at .373, their next highest regular in the projections is Mark DeRosa at .335. I have Buster Posey at .358 in limited action.

Congratulations Justin Turner!

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Baseball is a young man’s game. Whereas, a few short years ago, teams went into battle with a lot of guys with ten or twelve years of experience under their belt, these days such veterans are a dying breed. Whether you chalk it up to teams favoring youth because youth is less expensive, the game simply favoring younger, more athletic players, the decline in PED use among ballplayers or some combination of all three, the fact is that it’s better to be 23 in Major League Baseball these days than 33.

But Dodgers third baseman Justin Turner is an exception.

Turner is 33 — he turns 34 in November — yet he remains at or near the top of his game. It’s been a shorter season than usual for him due to an injury that cost him all of April and part of May, but his production when healthy remains at a near-MVP level. He’s hitting .318/.413/.525 on the year, and his return coincided with the Dodgers shaking off their early-season doldrums. Now, with his help, they are on the verge of yet another NL West title.

Not only that, but he’s doing that while holding down a second job!

(Getty Images)

Way to hustle, Justin!