REPORT: The Tigers may save Damon and Boras' bacon: 2 years/$14 million

Leave a comment

UPDATE: Brace yourselves kids — Ken Rosenthal is reporting that Mike Ilitch has authorized his flunkies to offer Johnny Damon two years and $14 million. Which, you’ll recall, is the amount of money Damon turned down from the Yankees, launching our favorite meme of the offseason (i.e. Scott Boras screwed up).

If this is true, I can only assume that Boras has the Bottled City of Kandor held hostage which Ilitch has sworn to protect.

If this happens and Boras’ bacon is saved, I’m going to destroy my den like Kane ripped apart the Xanadu bedroom after Susan Alexander left him.

3:14 P.M.: Jayson Stark is reporting that Scott Boras’ long national nightmare may be over and that Johnny Damon may be close to signing with the Tigers:

Two sources told ESPN.com that the Detroit Tigers
have made the largest offer, amid speculation around the industry that
that bid is in the range of one year, $7 million. There were
indications the sides were still discussing a possible two-year deal.
But even the Tigers’ one-year offer appears to be the biggest offer on
the table.

I’d still like to see the Braves get him at something less than $5 million, but if the Tigers want to give him $7 million they can have him.

Minor League Baseball eclipses 40 million in attendance for 14th consecutive season

Sara D. Davis/Getty Images
4 Comments

Minor League Baseball announced on Wednesday that, for the 14th consecutive season, the league has eclipsed 40 million in total attendance. 20 teams set single-game attendance records and seven teams set franchise records for single-game attendance in their current parks.

ESPN’s Keith Law, who has been covering the minor leagues for quite a while, did the math:

Minor League Baseball president and CEO Pat O’Conner, whose most prominent stint in the public eye involved him disingenuously justifying the underpaying of his players, said, “Minor League Baseball continues to be the best entertainment value in sports, and these numbers support that. For us to top 40 million fans for the 14th consecutive season despite the weather challenges our teams faced in April and May is a testament to the continued support of our loyal fan bases and the creative promotions and hard work done by all of our teams across the country.”

Major and Minor League Baseball are quite happy to make money hand over fist on the backs of their players, but are too cheap to pay them adequately for their labor.