President Obama compares Bank CEO salaries to ballplayer salaries

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Obama’s smooth. Look how he slams Carlos Zambrano and Vernon Wells without even mentioning their names:

President Barack Obama said he doesn’t “begrudge” the $17 million bonus awarded to JPMorgan Chase & Co. Chief Executive Officer Jamie Dimon or the $9 million issued to Goldman Sachs Group Inc. CEO Lloyd Blankfein, noting that some athletes take home more pay.

The president, speaking in an interview, said in response to a question that while $17 million is “an extraordinary amount of money” for Main Street, “there are some baseball players who are making more than that and don’t get to the World Series either, so I’m shocked by that as well.”

Paul Krugman predictably goes nuts, arguing that unlike bankers in this day and age, ballplayers aren’t beholden to taxpayers and the government. Krugman lives in New York, I presume. Guess he doesn’t get up to the Bronx or over to Queens very often, because there sit a couple billion dollars worth of public largess that does indeed benefit the ballplayers and the men who employ them. And that’s before you get to the government-granted antitrust exemption.

But that’s a nit, I suppose, because I generally agree that bank CEO pay is horrifying. It’s just that when it comes to criticizing it with baseball analogies I’d take a different approach than Krugman does. For example, I might note that in baseball, unlike in banking, you get punished for gambling.

(thanks to Pete Toms for the links)

Peter Bourjos returns to the Angels on minor league deal

Peter Bourjos
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Free agent outfielder Peter Bourjos is heading back to the Angels on a minor league deal, per a report from Steve Adams of MLB Trade Rumors. The agreement includes an invitation to spring training, but has not yet been officially confirmed by the team.

Bourjos, 31, played out a one-year gig with the Braves in 2018 and slashed .205/.239/.364 with four extra-base hits and a .603 OPS through a career-low 47 plate appearances. He showed more promise during a short-lived stint with the Giants’ Triple-A squad in the second half of the season, but elected free agency in early November and had yet to catch on with another major league club. His deal with the Angels represents a homecoming of sorts, as he played some of the best years of his career in Anaheim from 2010 to 2013 before getting traded to the Cardinals in a multiplayer swap for David Freese and Fernando Salas in 2014.

The veteran outfielder is long past his prime, but could still bring some value to the team as outfield depth behind Justin Upton, Mike Trout, and Kole Calhoun. Per Adams, he’s expected to compete for a spot as the Angels’ fourth outfielder, though he also has limited experience at DH as well.