President Obama compares Bank CEO salaries to ballplayer salaries

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Obama’s smooth. Look how he slams Carlos Zambrano and Vernon Wells without even mentioning their names:

President Barack Obama said he doesn’t “begrudge” the $17 million bonus awarded to JPMorgan Chase & Co. Chief Executive Officer Jamie Dimon or the $9 million issued to Goldman Sachs Group Inc. CEO Lloyd Blankfein, noting that some athletes take home more pay.

The president, speaking in an interview, said in response to a question that while $17 million is “an extraordinary amount of money” for Main Street, “there are some baseball players who are making more than that and don’t get to the World Series either, so I’m shocked by that as well.”

Paul Krugman predictably goes nuts, arguing that unlike bankers in this day and age, ballplayers aren’t beholden to taxpayers and the government. Krugman lives in New York, I presume. Guess he doesn’t get up to the Bronx or over to Queens very often, because there sit a couple billion dollars worth of public largess that does indeed benefit the ballplayers and the men who employ them. And that’s before you get to the government-granted antitrust exemption.

But that’s a nit, I suppose, because I generally agree that bank CEO pay is horrifying. It’s just that when it comes to criticizing it with baseball analogies I’d take a different approach than Krugman does. For example, I might note that in baseball, unlike in banking, you get punished for gambling.

(thanks to Pete Toms for the links)

Report: Twins sign Martín Pérez to one-year deal

Martin Perez
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Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic reports that the Twins have picked up free agent left-hander Martín Pérez on a one-year deal. Financial terms of the deal have yet to be announced, but it looks like a club option is included for the 2020 season. The Twins have not officially confirmed the signing.

Pérez, 27, missed 85 days of the Rangers’ 2018 campaign after undergoing elbow surgery on his non-throwing arm. He sustained the injury partway through the 2017 offseason; as the story goes, he was charged by a bull at his ranch in Venezuela and fell on his right arm as he was trying to get out of the animal’s path. (He later killed and ate said bull.) When he finally returned to the mound, he cobbled together a 2-7 record in 15 starts with a 6.22 ERA, 3.8 BB/9, 5.5 SO/9, and career-low -0.2 fWAR through 85 1/3 innings out of the rotation and bullpen.

As they approach the start of the 2019 season, the Twins will be looking for something a little more, well, bullish from Pérez. Prior to his injury, he turned in two solid seasons with the Rangers in 2016 and 2017, nearing the 200-inning threshold in both campaigns and providing a combined value of 4.2 fWAR at a time when Texas’ starters collectively ranked sixth-worst in the league.