Bill Hall doesn't want to be in the best shape of his life

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Bill Hall.jpgWe’ve heard about guys coming to camp in the best shape of their life, but Red Sox’ utilityman Bill Hall doesn’t want any part of that. Why? Because he thinks his workout program was a large part of what caused his post-2006 swoon:

Hall traces his problems since – he batted just .201 last year with Milwaukee and Seattle – to two root causes.

One was a workout regime he attacked with “reckless abandon,” in a
misguided attempt to look like an Adonis. He fasted to keep his body
fat down and neglected baseball-specific exercises, a problem he has
since rectified.

“I was trying to get in the best shape ever, and it probably hurt me
more than helped me as far as injuries,” Hall said. “I blame that on
myself and my own lack of knowledge.”

The other problem, he claims, was a severe high ankle sprain that he rushed back from and which ultimately messed with his swing.

There’s another explanation that Hall doesn’t mention, but which seems more plausible than a three-year ankle sprain and being too buff: teams just started paying closer attention to the guy after his breakout year, throwing him a lot more low and away stuff to see if he can reach it with that open, bat-on-the-shoulder stance of his, and he hasn’t yet been able to adjust to it and lay off the slop.

But maybe that’s too simple an explanation.

Minor League Baseball eclipses 40 million in attendance for 14th consecutive season

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Minor League Baseball announced on Wednesday that, for the 14th consecutive season, the league has eclipsed 40 million in total attendance. 20 teams set single-game attendance records and seven teams set franchise records for single-game attendance in their current parks.

ESPN’s Keith Law, who has been covering the minor leagues for quite a while, did the math:

Minor League Baseball president and CEO Pat O’Conner, whose most prominent stint in the public eye involved him disingenuously justifying the underpaying of his players, said, “Minor League Baseball continues to be the best entertainment value in sports, and these numbers support that. For us to top 40 million fans for the 14th consecutive season despite the weather challenges our teams faced in April and May is a testament to the continued support of our loyal fan bases and the creative promotions and hard work done by all of our teams across the country.”

Major and Minor League Baseball are quite happy to make money hand over fist on the backs of their players, but are too cheap to pay them adequately for their labor.