Ruben Amaro: "I'm not a Dummy"

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Despite pulling off the Halladay trade and extension, Phillies General Manager Ruben Amaro has continued to get flak for not keeping Cliff Lee too and shooting for the moon in 2010.  He responded yesterday:

“I was talking to some people the other day,” Amaro recalled, “and I
said, ‘I’m not a dummy. I know what Cliff Lee means to our rotation in
addition to Halladay and [Cole] Hamels. It’s a no-brainer.’ … Our goal is to be a contender every year — not
just to be a competitor, but to be a contender every year. That’s
really my job. As an executive of the club, it’s my job to do what I
can to try to maintain that level of talent on the club and that hope
from the fans. So, yes, I’d like to have a championship, but not at the
cost of having our organization not be good for 10 years.

I’ve wondered about decision to trade Lee too, but I’m not going to go crazy over it. The Phillies should still be favored to win the division this year, and there’s no real reason to believe that they’d have the resources to sign Cliff Lee beyond 2010 after locking up Halladay. They did what they did, it’s not the worst move anyone has made this winter, and life will go on without Cliff Lee.

Still, I’m not quite sure that Amaro’s reasoning here is all that compelling.  Sure, no one wants to have their team “not be good for 10 years,” but is the haul they got for Lee — Phillippe Aumont, Tyson Gillies and Juan Ramirez — the sort of thing that prevents that?  As Matthew noted at the time of the trade, the Phillies, like the Mariners, likely view Aumont as a relief prospect.  Ramirez has potential, but he got beat up a bit last year and is still a work in progress.  Gillies had nice numbers last year in strong hitting environments, but probably projects to be a fourth outfielder.

Like I said, Amaro has a ring and has made some good moves, so he’s entitled to some benefit of the doubt. But ask yourself: is a relief prospect, a raw starter and a potential fourth outfielder the kind of thing that keeps a team competitive for a decade?  Put differently, are they worth a season of a stone-cold killer of a rotation plus a first round pick once Lee leaves via free agency?

I kind of don’t think so.

Marcus Stroman: Blue Jays are “f– terrible”

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Blue Jays starter Marcus Stroman strugged in Sunday afternoon’s start against the Red Sox, yielding four runs (three earned) over five innings. He fell to 2-7 with a 5.86 ERA. The Jays dropped three of four games to the Sox in the series and now sit with a 43-52 record heading into the All-Star break.

Steve Buffery of the Toronto Sun reports that while Stroman was initially cool, calm, and collected when speaking to the media after the game, he eventually snapped. Stroman was asked by a reporter about breaking into professional baseball with short-season Single-A Vancouver in 2012. Stroman yelled at the reporter, noting that his team had just lost to the Red Sox, and called his team “f– terrible.” Keegan Matheson’s account of the situation lines up with Buffery’s as well.

Prior to the outburst, Stroman had just praised his teammates, saying, “My team picks me up a ton. They pick me up all year. I should be able to pitch better in times like that when my team doesn’t have my back. Because they’ve had my back a ton of times. So, love my guys on my team and like I said, I would go to war with them any day.”

Stroman will have off until Friday, so hopefully the time off helps him clear his mind. It has understandably been a frustrating season in Toronto.