Glen Perkins doesn't sound long for Minnesota

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Glen Perkins filed a grievance against the Twins when they optioned him to Triple-A rather than keep him on the major-league disabled list with a shoulder injury. The two sides have since settled the case, but the move left Perkins just short of the service time needed for arbitration eligibility, costing him about $500,000 and causing a whole bunch of tension.
Injuries and inconsistent performances along with the grievance and Minnesota’s glut of young fifth-starter candidates made Perkins a prime offseason trade candidate, and the Twins reportedly offered him to the Padres for Kevin Kouzmanoff at the winter meetings.
For now at least Perkins remains Twins property, but the former first-round pick and native Minnesotan certainly sounds like a man who expects to be traded:

I guess I really found out the hard way that it’s a business. I spent my life cheering for that team. I got drafted by them and got to the majors quick, and two weeks later we’re in the playoffs. I had a really good year in ’08, and everything was rosy. You find out the hard way that it doesn’t really matter.



I think I’m more prepared for this year than I ever have been. I feel like I’m going into an uphill battle [for a roster spot], but I’m fine. My arm’s healthy, and I feel like I’m a major league pitcher. I’m sure if [the Twins] don’t think that, then someone else does.

Those quotes come via an excellent article by Joe Christensen of the Minneapolis Star Tribune, which includes all kinds of other intriguing details about Perkins’ situation. I’d definitely have bet on a Perkins trade at the beginning of the offseason and probably still would, but if the Twins can’t find an acceptable deal for him they could delay a decision on Perkins while lessening the rotation glut by simply optioning him back to Triple-A again. Imagine his quotes if that happens …

Nationals’ major leaguers to continue offering financial assistance to minor leaguers

Sean Doolittle
Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images
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On Sunday, we learned that while the Nationals would continue to pay their minor leaguers throughout the month of June, their weekly stipend would be lowered by 25 percent, from $400 to $300. In an incredible act of solidarity, Nationals reliever Sean Doolittle and his teammates put out a statement, saying they would be covering the missing $100 from the stipends.

After receiving some criticism, the Nationals reversed course, agreeing to pay their minor leaguers their full $400 weekly stipend.

Doolittle and co. have not withdrawn their generosity. On Wednesday, Doolittle released another statement, saying that he and his major league teammates would continue to offer financial assistance to Nationals minor leaguers through the non-profit organization More Than Baseball.

The full statement:

Washington Nationals players were excited to learn that our minor leaguers will continue receiving their full stipends. We are grateful that efforts have been made to restore their pay during these challenging times.

We remain committed to supporting them. Nationals players are partnering with More Than Baseball to contribute funds that will offer further assistance and financial support to any minor leaguers who were in the Nationals organization as of March 1.

We’ll continue to stand with them as we look forward to resuming our 2020 MLB season.

Kudos to Doolittle and the other Nationals continuing to offer a helping hand in a trying time. The players shouldn’t have to subsidize their employers’ labor expenses, but that is the world we live in today.