Scott Boras tries to spin the Damon situation. And fails.

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In the wake of the Yankees doing the moonwalk from Johnny Damon and signing Randy Winn, Scott Boras is trying to spin, but he’s doing a bad job of it.  First Boras:

“The Yankees never even made an offer to me regarding Johnny Damon
during the entire process, and the reason for that is they had
budgetary constraints.”

Um, Scott, that’s not what your client said last month:

Damon said in a text message Friday that the Yankees had offered two
years and $14 million, while he had offered to return for two years and
$20 million. That was true, a Yankees official confirmed.

Confronted with that inconsistency, Boras says “that it was not an offer, because the Yankees told him they needed to hear from Johnson first.”

Which smells like high-grade horse manure.  I mean, really, why on Earth would the Yankees make a non-offer, or whatever Boras wants to call it, to Damon while they were still waiting to hear from Johnson?  Damon thinks it was an offer. The Yankees think it was an offer. The only one who doesn’t think it was an offer is Boras, who right now is the one running for cover.

My suspicion is that what really happened was that (1) the Yankees offered Damon $14 million; (2) Boras rejected it and (3) the Yankees moved on to Nick Johnson, possibly telling Boras that they’d talk again if Johnson got away, but by no means holding some contingent whatever-it-was open in the interim.  This seems to be borne out by Brian Cashman’s account: “On Dec. 17, Scott’s exact words were that he would not take a penny
less than $13 million a year for two years. We believed
him.”  Nick Johnson signed on December 18th.

Rosenthal read today’s Times story and sums it up pretty succinctly: “There is simply no excuse for a player of this quality to be in such a compromised position.”  I agree. That player was compromised by an agent’s spectacular failure to understand his client’s market.  

Addison Russell’s wife Melisa comes forward with details about years of abuse

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Last year, Cubs shortstop Addison Russell‘s wife Melisa made an Instagram post in which she accused her husband of cheating on her. Melisa’s friend added a comment in which she alleged Addison had been physically abusive towards Melisa. Addison denied the allegations. Major League Baseball started an investigation, but Melisa chose not to cooperate. Addison was not punished and the issue mostly went away.

On Wednesday, Melisa posted on her WordPress blog, which is linked on her Instagram with over 44,000 followers. In the post, Melisa details years of emotional, verbal, and physical abuse from Addison. Addison’s behavior, as detailed by Melisa, checks many of the boxes listed by The National Domestic Violence Hotline. As the abuse went on, Melisa says she suffered from depression. Eventually, she filed for divorce and began to regain control of her life, ultimately gaining the courage to come forward with what she had been through.

Read Melisa’s post if you want to know the full details of what went on. The details may be triggering for those of you who have also suffered abuse or are sensitive to the idea.

The Cubs and Major League Baseball should attempt to speak with Melisa to develop a strategy moving forward. Melisa may not cooperate again, which is her right and would not in any way diminish her allegations. If Melssa agrees, the Cubs should suspend Russell immediately and indefinitely. Failing that, Major League Baseball should suspend Russell immediately and indefinitely.

Victims of abuse, usually cisgender women and transgender people, have nothing material to gain by coming forward with allegations, particularly against someone in the public spotlight with legions of fans who will defend their favorite player to an unhealthy degree. Those who do come forward with details of their abuse should be given the benefit of the doubt and applauded for their courage.