A bit more about Grant Desme

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Desme.jpgThis morning Buster Olney said — I think in response to a question a lot of us had, but were too respectful of the man’s decision to ask — that the A’s have no expectation that Grant Desme, the prospect who is
leaving baseball to become a priest, is going to change his mind.

I think Aaron covered most of the relevant angles on this the other day, but let me throw one more thought out there: the people who are saying “well, why couldn’t he have waited until after his baseball career was over to have done this?” don’t really have a handle on what becoming a priest really entails.

I’m not talking about the spiritual commitment here — I’m way out of my depth commenting on that. I’m referring to the academic commitment. The logistics and mechanics of seminary school. As the Columbus Dispatch’s Todd Jones* reported in a fabulous six-part series last summer, it is an extremely demanding undertaking. It certainly does not sound like the sort of thing one would be able to slide into easily after several years following some other pursuit.

Upshot: it’s more likely that Desme could wash out of seminary school as a result of its rigorous demands and get back into baseball than it would be for him to play out his baseball career and commit to seminary school.

*Jones is actually a sports reporter by trade, and a good one at that, so I’d be pretty interested to hear his take on all of this.

Astros assistant GM Mike Elias reported to be next Orioles general manager

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Bob Nightengale of USA Today reports that Astros assistant GM Mike Elias will be the new general manager of the Orioles “barring a change of heart.”

Elias, 35, has been the Astros’ assistant general manager since August 2016. He had previously served as Houston’s scouting director and, before that, as a scout for the Cardinals. He was part of the team that came over from the Cardinals when Jeff Luhnow joined the Astros.

If he does take the O’s job his work will certainly be cut out for him. Baltimore was historically bad in 2018, finishing 47-115 thanks to a roster full of expensive, past-their-prime players and an underdeveloped farm system. He’ll have to hit the ground running too, as he’ll not join the team until nearly two months into the club’s offseason, having had no time to assess its needs and personnel. Oh, and the Winter Meetings begin in a little over three weeks.