The Jerome Holtzman Award?

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Jayson Stark thinks that closers don’t already get enough phony glory due to their often meaningless, personalized stat, so he proposes a special award just for them:

It’s time for the Baseball Writers’ Association of America to establish
a new award for relief pitchers. And if it were up to us, we’d call it
the Jerome Holtzman Award, in honor of the late, great Chicago
baseball-writing legend who invented the modern save rule

Stark’s argument in favor of it basically comes down to his belief that closers are somehow the “forgotten men” during awards season and that we need something special to recognize their accomplishments.

I actually think we have the opposite problem: because they have a special stat open only to them, the value of the closer has become so artificially inflated, both in financial terms and in terms of perceived value to winning ballgames, that their very existence has altered traditional baseball strategy.

As so many others have noted, modern managers routinely hold their best relievers out of the highest leverage situations because someone — maybe Tony La Russa — decided that it’s more important to put them in the game when there are no base runners and they have a three-run lead. Creating some new award to honor that interesting but by no means critical role would only make this worse.

Neat idea, Jayson, but as far as January-doldrum conversation starters go, I’ll take a half dozen more steroid arguments.

Max Scherzer, with broken nose, strikes out 10 Phillies over seven shutout innings

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Nationals starter Max Scherzer bunted a ball into his face during batting practice on Tuesday, breaking his nose in the process. He ended up with a gnarly looking shiner around his right eye, making him appear a bit like Terminator. Scherzer still took the ball to start the second game of Wednesday night’s doubleheader against the Phillies.

Despite the injury, Scherzer was incredibly effective, limiting the Phillies to four hits and two walks across seven shutout innings, striking out 10 batters in the process. He might even have had some extra adrenaline going, as he averaged 96.2 MPH on his fastball, his highest average fastball velocity in a game since September 2012, per MLB.com’s Jamal Collier. The Nationals provided Scherzer with just one run of support, coming on a Brian Dozier solo home run off of Jake Arrieta in the second inning, but it was enough.

Wander Suero worked a scoreless top of the eighth with a pair of strikeouts. Victor Robles added a solo homer off of Pat Neshek in the bottom half. Closer Sean Doolittle took over in the ninth, working a 1-2-3 frame to give the Nats their 2-0 victory.

Over his last six starts, Scherzer now has a 0.88 ERA with a 59/8 K/BB ratio across 41 innings. He has gone six innings, struck out at least nine batters, and held the opposition to two or fewer runs in each of those six starts.