What would you do with a 26-man roster?

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Jonah Keri speculates that when the labor deal is revisited after the 2011 season the owners may offer up a 26th roster spot to the union in exchange for one thing or another.  Seems totally plausible to me.

He also assumes that rather than do something useful such as add a position player and increase platoon usage, most managers will add a 13th or 14th pitcher to the roster.  Also seems totally plausible to me.

If there was any justice in the universe, Bud Selig’s little competition committee would propose that teams (a) be limited to 11 pitchers on the roster at any given time; but (b) be given greater flexibility to shuttle pitchers up and down from the minors to deal with fatigue and injuries and stuff.  That way you would be able to enhance the game by increasing the possibility of more creative deployment of position players while not unduly taxing precious arms.

But then I remember that Tony La Russa is member of that committee and that we’ll all be lucky to escape this thing without there being a new rule mandating two pitching changes per inning.

Manny Machado called for interference with Orlando Arcia

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Fresh off our “Manny Machado didn’t hustle” post, here’s one about him trying a little too hard. Machado was called for interference in the bottom of the fourth inning during Monday night’s NLCS Game 3 against the Brewers at Dodger Stadium. It was actually Machado’s second attempt to interfere with Orlando Arcia during the game.

In the bottom of the second, Machado led off with a single. Cody Bellinger followed up by hitting a grounder to second baseman Travis Shaw, who fed to Arcia. Machado slid towards Arcia enough to disrupt the play, allowing Bellinger to reach first base safely. The Brewers didn’t challenge, in part because Arcia didn’t attempt a throw.

Fast forward to the bottom of the fourth. Machado again leads off and again reaches base, this time with a walk. Bellinger hits another grounder. First baseman Jesús Aguilar snags the ball and fires to Arcia covering the second base bag. Machado slides into second base and reaches out with his right hand to mess with Arcia’s throw to first base. It succeeds, as Arcia’s throw skips past first base towards the dugout. Brewers manager Craig Counsell challenged the call, alleging slide interference (the “Chase Utley rule”). The umpires reviewed the play and agreed that Machado did indeed interfere with Arcia, so Bellinger was called out. What made Machado’s effort even worse is that Bellinger would’ve reached easily regardless, so there was no need to interfere with Arcia.

The Dodgers trail the Brewers 1-0 through the first half of the game. The Brewers got their run early thanks to an RBI double by Ryan Braun off of Walker Buehler in the top of the first. Jhoulys Chacín has pitched excellently for the Brewers thus far.