There are 11 minutes of action in an entire football game

Leave a comment

The next time your football fan friends talk about how boring baseball is, shoot them this link:

According to a Wall Street Journal study of four recent broadcasts,
and similar estimates by researchers, the average amount of time the
ball is in play on the field during an NFL game is about 11 minutes.
In other words, if you tally up everything that happens between the
time the ball is snapped and the play is whistled dead by the
officials, there’s barely enough time to prepare a hard-boiled egg . . . the ratio of inaction to action is approximately 10 to 1.

Seventeen minutes are devoted to replays. Commercials take between an hour and seventy-five minutes, or 60% of the broadcast.  Sixty-seven minutes are devoted to players standing around and broadcasters bleating about whatever it is broadcasters bleat about.

I’m curious about what the ratios are for baseball. It obviously depends on what you count as dead time.  I would count the time after the batter is actually in the
box and the pitcher is getting the signs as “action,” because the ball is technically live and there’s something valuable and observable happening then, but many might not.

In fact, football partisans may point out the difficulty in determining the difference between action and inaction in a baseball game as even more damning than their own game’s pitiful ratio.  Tomato-tomahto.  Ultimately, arguing football vs. baseball is like religion or politics and facts kinda stop mattering at some point.

But one thing is indisputable: baseball is better than football in every conceivable way.  You can look it up.

Report: Yankees, Reds finalizing trade for Sonny Gray

Sonny Gray
Getty Images
5 Comments

Barring physicals and roster reshuffling, the Yankees and Reds are all but ready to finalize a deal involving right-hander Sonny Gray, Fancred’s Jon Heyman reported Saturday. The exact return has not been confirmed, but Heyman hears that the Yankees will receive top infield prospect Shed Long and a draft pick in exchange for Gray, with an as-yet unnamed third player possibly involved as well.

According to several reports earlier in the day, negotiations came down to the wire as the Yankees first had their eye on the Reds’ no. 6 prospect, 22-year-old catcher Tyler Stephenson. The Reds ultimately elected to hang on to Stephenson and send Long to New York, as they currently have a greater need for catching depth and weren’t expected to be able to provide a full-time role for the infielder in 2019. Long, 23, is ranked seventh in the Reds’ system and appears to be nearing his MLB debut after batting .261/.353/.412 with 12 homers and a .765 OPS across 522 PA at Double-A Pensacola last year.

Gray figures to step into a prominent role within the Reds’ rotation, which is likely to be a mix of recently-acquired left-hander Alex Wood and right-handers Tanner Roark, Luis Castillo, Anthony DeSclafani, and Tyler Mahle, among several others. Despite Gray’s struggle to remain productive on the mound — he’s three years removed from his only All-Star campaign and turned in a disappointing 4.90 ERA and 2.16 SO/BB rate in 2018 — he might yet help stabilize a team that trotted out the fifth-worst rotation in the majors last season. If, on the other hand, the veteran righty finds the hitter-friendly confines of Great American Ball Park a little too unforgiving this year, the Reds can take some comfort in the fact that he’s due to enter free agency in 2020.