There are 11 minutes of action in an entire football game

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The next time your football fan friends talk about how boring baseball is, shoot them this link:

According to a Wall Street Journal study of four recent broadcasts,
and similar estimates by researchers, the average amount of time the
ball is in play on the field during an NFL game is about 11 minutes.
In other words, if you tally up everything that happens between the
time the ball is snapped and the play is whistled dead by the
officials, there’s barely enough time to prepare a hard-boiled egg . . . the ratio of inaction to action is approximately 10 to 1.

Seventeen minutes are devoted to replays. Commercials take between an hour and seventy-five minutes, or 60% of the broadcast.  Sixty-seven minutes are devoted to players standing around and broadcasters bleating about whatever it is broadcasters bleat about.

I’m curious about what the ratios are for baseball. It obviously depends on what you count as dead time.  I would count the time after the batter is actually in the
box and the pitcher is getting the signs as “action,” because the ball is technically live and there’s something valuable and observable happening then, but many might not.

In fact, football partisans may point out the difficulty in determining the difference between action and inaction in a baseball game as even more damning than their own game’s pitiful ratio.  Tomato-tomahto.  Ultimately, arguing football vs. baseball is like religion or politics and facts kinda stop mattering at some point.

But one thing is indisputable: baseball is better than football in every conceivable way.  You can look it up.

Astros clinch postseason berth with 11-3 win over Angels

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No surprise here: The Astros are headed back to the postseason to defend their title following a landslide 11-3 win over the Angels on Friday. This figures to be their third playoff run since 2015, though they have yet to wrap up the AL West with a division title.

First baseman Yuli Gurriel led the charge on Friday, smashing a grand slam in the first inning and tacking on a two-run homer in the second and RBI single in the fifth to help the Astros to a seven-run lead. The Angels eventually returned fire, first with Mike Trout‘s 418-foot homer in the sixth, then with an RBI hit from Francisco Arcia in the seventh, but they couldn’t close the gap in time to overtake the Astros.

On the mound, right-hander Gerrit Cole clinched his 15th win of the year after holding the Angels to seven innings of three-run, 12-strikeout ball. His sixth strikeout of the night — delivered on an 83.1-MPH knuckle curveball to Kaleb Cowart — also marked the 1,000th strikeout of his career to date. He was backed by flawless performances by lefty reliever Tony Sipp and rookie right-hander Dean Deetz, both of whom turned in scoreless innings as the offense barreled toward an 11-3 finish with Jake Marisnick‘s sac bunt and George Springer‘s three-run shot in the eighth.

Despite having qualified for the playoffs, the Astros still carry a magic number of 6 as they look to clinch a third straight division title. They’re currently up against the Athletics, who entered Friday’s contest against the Twins just four games back of first place in the AL West.