Mets are "disappointed" in Beltran; won't take any further action

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UPDATE:  The Mets have spoken.  Assistant GM John Rico says that they say that they had the conversations with Boras, but that “the conversation
with Scott was very direct in we said we do not want him to
have surgery until we’ve reviewed the info.” Ricco said that the team wanted a “third opinion.”  They are “disappointed” in Beltran for getting the surgery without team consent, but that they will not file any sort of grievance or otherwise take action against Beltran or Boras or anyone. 

At this point I’d call it case-closed. Bad communication on each side, it would seem, and perhaps a bit of mistrust of the Mets and their medical staff on behalf of Beltran and Boras.  At this point, however, I think the Mets will let this go completely as long as they have a healthy and productive Carlos Beltran come, say, May. 

1:59 P.M:  Boras is awesome for getting ahead of the news. In about, oh, a minute, the Mets are holding a conference call to address the Carlos Beltran situation.  Presumably they’re still upset and will explain why. Boras preempts them with this:

Scott Boras told me the office for Dr. Richard Steadman, the surgeon
who performed Carlo Beltran’s knee surgery, received workman’s
compensation paperwork to pay for the procedure from Mets’ trainer Ray
Ramirez.

“The Mets gave consent to pay for the surgery,” Boras said.

Boras also said he had conversations on Tuesday with both Jeff Wilpon
and Omar Minaya about the surgery. Beltran also spoke with Minaya,
according to Boras.

I suppose there could be some other level of consent that is technically required here, but if what Boras said is true, the Mets can’t honestly claim that they didn’t know what was going on, can they?

Aaron Hicks would like to avoid Tommy John surgery

Aaron Hicks
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The Yankees’ 2019 run ended in heartbreak on Saturday night when, despite a stunning ninth-inning comeback, they fell 6-4 to the Astros and officially lost their bid for the AL pennant. Now, facing a long offseason, there are a few decisions to be made.

One of those falls on the shoulders of outfielder Aaron Hicks, who told reporters that he “thinks he can continue playing without Tommy John surgery.” It’s unclear whose recommendation he’s basing that decision on, however, as MLB.com’s Bryan Hoch points out that Tommy John surgery was recommended during the slugger’s most recent meeting with Dr. Neal ELAttrache.

Hicks originally sustained a season-ending right flexor strain in early August and held several consultations with ElAttrache and the Yankees’ physician in the months that followed. He spent two and a half months on the 60-day injured list and finally returned to the Yankees’ roster during the ALCS, in which he went 2-for-13 with a base hit and a Game 5 three-run homer against the Astros.

Of course, a handful of strong performances doesn’t definitively prove that the outfielder is fully healed — or that he’ll be able to avoid aggravating the injury with further activity. Granted, Tommy John surgery isn’t a minor procedure; it’s one that requires up to a year of rest and rehabilitation before most players are cleared to throw again. Should Hicks wait to reverse his decision until he reports for spring training in 2020, though, it could push his return date out by another six months or so.