Congress is not going to get involved in the McGwire business

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I only mention this because, just like the will-Bonds-be-the-next-to-apologize thing, tons of people are asking me if I think Congress will get back into the steroids thing in light of Mark McGwire’s admission.

No and no.

The first no is based on the legalities involved. The only reason they’d have to haul McGwire back or to have him investigated or what have you is for perjury. Anyone who spent any time looking back at the tapes of McGwire’s 2005 testimony, however, quickly realizes that there’s no basis for even the suggestion of perjury. He didn’t say anything. If there was any hope at all that he’d be legally scrutinized over his statements, that hope was dashed when the House committee refused to follow up or compel him to either testify or take the Fifth Amendment.   You can view this one of two ways: (1) Congress abdicating its duty to find the facts it purported to be trying to find that day; or (2) Congress tacitly acknowledging that the purpose of that hearing was grandstanding and nothing more. Either way, the ship has sailed.

The second no comes from the statements of the two men in charge of that hearing, Committee chair Tom Davis and ranking Democrat Henry Waxman.  First Davis:

”He looked ridiculous to most of the public, but he didn’t have many
good options. We put him in a pretty tight spot. He was candid and
honest in our interrogation of him.”

Some interrogation. I’ve seen Larry King get tougher on a Gabor sister.  Here’s Waxman:

“Mark McGwire is doing the right thing by telling the truth about his
steroid use. His statement sends an important message to kids about the
importance of avoiding steroids.”

Congress should never have gotten involved in this in the first place. They did anyway, but at least now, at long last, they realize that it’s time to stay out of it.

Joe West explains the fan interference call he clearly blew

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One of the biggest plays in a game full of big plays in last night’s Red Sox-Astros game was the call of fan interference that took a home run away from Jose Altuve.

Well, actually, it didn’t technically take a home run away, because right field umpire Joe West never called it a home run to begin with. He called it, sorta, tentatively, fan interference and it was thrown in the lap of replay officials.

For my part — and, it seems to me, for the part of most folks watching the game — West blew the call. The fan in question did not reach out onto the field of play — Mookie Betts‘ glove entered the stands — and the rules clearly state that no interference is called if a spectator comes in contact with a batted or thrown ball without reaching onto the field of play. It’s only if he or she reaches out onto the field. If the ball is in the stands, all’s fair in love and souvenir-snagging.

After the game, West was interviewed about the call. Here is how he explained it.

 

Q. What did you see that prompted the initial call of fan interference?
JOE WEST: Well, when he jumped up to reach for the ball, the spectator reached out of the stands and hit him over the playing field and closed his glove.

Q. So the ball had not yet crossed the railing?
JOE WEST: No.

Q. And Betts’ glove had not yet crossed the railing, do you believe?
JOE WEST: No.

Q. Okay. Did the fan —
JOE WEST: Here’s the whole play, here’s the whole play. He hit the ball to right field. He jumped up to try to make a catch. The fan interfered with him over the playing field. That’s why I called spectator interference.

Q. So it’s a clear call in your mind?
JOE WEST: Yes.

Q. Were there already — was there a single call that you saw, that the replay officials saw on replay that confirmed —
JOE WEST: I don’t know what he saw. He just — the replay official said I was right.

Q. Okay.
JOE WEST: That’s all. He said I have nothing that can change it.

That last bit is not entirely true, by the way. They didn’t say, specifically, that West was right. Rather, they could not find sufficient evidence to overturn West, so the call stood. Which is an important distinction: if the ruling was that West was definitively correct, the ruling would’ve been that West’s call was “confirmed.” That is not what they said. They said the call “stands,” which meant that they didn’t have enough evidence to overturn West.

That’s a different issue in its entirety, by the way: the deference given to the field umpires and the high burden replay officials have to overturn them. Here, I suspect it was a matter of them not having sufficient camera angles establishing that the fan had not reached onto the field. I think that’s nuts given what even the primary view and some basic common sense showed — Betts did not run to the wall and then jump straight up, failing to break the plane into the stands — but the current replay system places a high burden on replay guys overruling the field umpires.

That whole setup is dumb. This is not the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals and guys like Joe West should not be treated like District Court judges to whom deference should always be granted. Replay officials have better views almost every single time and they should be able to simply substitute their judgment rather than meet some high burden aimed, I suspect, at making field umpires feel like they’re not losing power now that baseball takes a 21st century approach to officiating rather than a 19th century approach.

Unfortunately for the Astros, that is not how the replay rule works. Unfortunately for the Astros, Joe West’s judgment was to be deferred to. Unfortunately for the Astros, West blew that call and, unfortunately for the Astros, it cost them a two-run homer that could’ve changed the outcome of this game.