Citi Field and the mob

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I’d say “only in New York,” but I spent a fair amount of time in my
legal practice doing construction law, and I learned that this kind of thing happens in
lots of places
:

The Mets shelled out $51.6 million in taxpayer money to contractors
shunned by the city for their ties to the Mafia, labor corruption or
bribery, The Post has learned. At least seven contractors the
city avoids were hired by the team to build Citi Field between 2006 and
2009, according to government records.

The tainted companies were paid from a $91 million pot the city Economic Development Corp. gave to the Mets.

It’s probably worth noting that a “tainted” company doesn’t mean a mobbed-up company any more than a company on some city-approved list is legitimate. There are tons of mob-connected or at the very least shady construction outfits on municipal approved lists all over the country because they made the right political contributions.

Likewise, there are lots of legit companies that are on non-approved lists because they wouldn’t play ball with with the right people. With “right people” usually being defined as a nogoodnik crony who got appointed to some mid-level job in the public works department because his brother-in-law knows people who knows people or something.  Big city construction is ugly.

And besides: which is the bigger misuse of money: $51.6 million to the mafia, or $36 million to Oliver Perez?

Roberto Osuna suspended 75 games for violating domestic violence policy

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Blue Jays closer Roberto Osuna has been suspended for 75 games without pay after violating the league’s Joint Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault and Child Abuse Policy, Major League Baseball announced Friday. The suspension is retroactive to May 8 and will lift on August 4. Osuna has decided not to appeal the decision.

Osuna was charged with one count of assault against his girlfriend following his arrest on May 8. Per FanRag Sports’ Jon Heyman, the reliever is set to undergo trial on July 9. No details regarding his specific actions in the case have been publicly released, but Heyman adds that MLB was reportedly able to interview the victim prior to issuing the suspension. League Commissioner Rob Manfred issued the following statement:

My office has completed its investigation into the allegation that Roberto Osuna violated Major League Baseball’s Joint Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault and Child Abuse Policy on May 8, 2018. Having reviewed all of the available evidence, I have concluded that Mr. Osuna violated the Policy and should be subject to discipline in the form of an unpaid suspension that will expire on August 4th.

Osuna, 23, pitched just 15 1/3 innings during the 2018 season prior to his arrest. He has been on administrative leave since May 8.