Matt Kemp doesn't want a long term deal

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The Dodgers have started to talk to Matt Kemp about a long term deal, but Kemp seems content to go year-to-year through arbitration and hit the market one day:

“We’ve got to figure out if it even makes sense to do a multiyear. The
club is looking for something, the player is looking for something.
Sometimes it’s difficult to find a meeting of the minds. In that case,
we’re fine doing it one year at a time.”

Kemp is a Gold Glove winner, a Silver Slugger Award winner and appears to be on a rocket ship trajectory towards super stardom. Generally speaking, I can’t imagine that any player wouldn’t want a long term deal. But given where Kemp is right now, the kind of long term deal he’d be interested in wouldn’t be the sort of long term deal the team would be interested in (i.e. one with no significant discount).

Kemp is probably going to make north of $4 million in arbitration (or in a pre-arb, one-year contract) this year, and barring injuries, it’ll raise quickly from there.  If I were him, I wouldn’t be in any hurry to sign an extension.

Brewers promote David Stearns from GM to president of baseball operations

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It used to be that the top dog in a team’s baseball operations department was the general manager. That has changed over the past several years with some combination of title inflation, a genuine addition of supervisory layers and, on some level, employe poaching insurance leading to the top dog now being called, usually, a “president of baseball operations.”

Brewers’ general manager David Stearns is the latest to assume that tile, as the club just announced that he has been promoted to Milwaukee’s president of baseball operations. He has also received a contract extension of unknown length.

Not a big shock given how well the Brewers did in 2018, winning the NL Central title and playing in the NLCS. It’s also worth noting — with a nod to that “employee poaching insurance” item above — that Stearns has drawn some interest from other organizations. It’s thus not unfair to see the promotion is both a thanks for a job well done and a means of keeping other teams’ hands off of him, as employees are generally not given permission to interview for lateral moves, but are given permission to interview for promotions.

The Mudville Nine may have wanted to steal him from Milwaukee, but for Stearns to get a promotion from where he is now would require the creation of some other lofty title.