Dept. of Things You Didn't Know: Roger Clemens' kid raked last year

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Sure, it was at a very hitter-friendly park in a very hitter-friendly league, but Koby Clemens hit the cover off the ball last season:

Say what you want about the Astros’ eighth-round pick of the 2005
Draft, that he’s a product of a hitting league and a very friendly
ballpark, but it’s difficult to look past the fact that he finished the
season with the most RBIs in all of the Minor Leagues, won the
California League batting title with a .345 average and led the Class A
Advanced circuit in RBIs (121), doubles (45), slugging percentage
(.636) and OPS (1.055).

Clemens was an 8th round pick by in 2005, he tends to have to repeat levels before he does anything solid and he isn’t even the Astros’ top-rated catching prospect (that would be Jason Castro). Still, he has power and some patience at the plate and may just manage to make it to the bigs someday if the stars align just so.

Not bad for someone who seemed like a nepotism pick at the time.

Yadier Molina ties record for the most games caught with one team

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Yadier Molina has two World Series rings, multiple Gold Gloves, Platinum Gloves, All-Star appearances and a Silver Slugger award. He now has an all-time record too.

The record: the most games caught with one team. Last night he caught his 1756th career game with the Cardinals, with ties him with Gabby Hartnett of the Cubs, who last caught in 1941 and set the record in 1940, his last season with Chicago. Molina will break the record next time he dons the tools of ignorance, likely tonight against the Phillies.

Given how badly catchers get beaten up — and Molina has taken a beating at times in his career — and given how well mastery of the position leads to a catcher earning journeyman status, as it were, it’s quite a thing to catch that many games for one team.

Given that Molina is under contract with the Cardinals for two more seasons and has stated his desire to retire a Cardinal many times, he’s likely to put that record so far out of reach that it’ll likely take at least another 78 years to break it, if indeed it is ever broken.