UPDATE: The Orioles have not offered Matt Holliday $130 million

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UPDATE: “Andy MacPhail vehemently denied a report today from Foxsports.com that said the club had made an 8-year, $130 million offer to free-agent outfielder Matt Holliday.”  Buster Olney‘s source: “The story is not accurate in any respect.”

Ahem. I wonder if someone, say, an agent known for trying to create the perception of high demand for his clients, had anything to do with getting that little nugget out there?
   

2:54 P.M.: Following up on yesterday’s stuff about the Cardinals’ optimism regarding Matt Holliday comes word from FOX’s Tracy Ringolsby that the Orioles, who had previously been sniffing around Holliday, could be more serious players than we first thought:

Baltimore, meanwhile, did make an eight-year, $130 million offer to
Holliday, and general manager Andy MacPhail did discuss the possibility
of arranging a meeting between himself, Orioles owner Peter Angelos and
Holliday in Austin, Tex., where Holliday is living in the offseason.

$130 million over eight years is $16.25 million a year. That’s way more playable than I think anyone had assumed Baltimore’s offer to be, and certainly looks a lot nicer a few weeks deeper into the offseason.  I would assume that, like the Cardinals’ offer, which is reportedly in the $15-16 million range, some of those years are all vesty and optiony.

But if there’s any movement on that — say, one extra guaranteed year or some easing up on the rigor of the vesting — Holliday could easily wind up in Baltimore instead of St. Louis.  And the fact that the Orioles are willing to talk to Holliday about this some more suggests that there could be movement.
 

Nevada Senate vote on proposed A’s stadium in Las Vegas extended until next week

MLB: Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum
Robert Edwards-USA TODAY Sports
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CARSON CITY, Nev. — The Nevada Senate adjourned Thursday without voting on a financing bill for a proposed $1.5 billion Las Vegas Strip stadium for the Oakland Athletics, extending the special legislative session into the next week amid negotiations over whether to contribute $380 million in public funding to the project.

The measure can still be amended by lawmakers, and if it passes the Senate it would still need approval from the Assembly before going to the desk of Republican Gov. Joe Lombardo, who has expressed support for it. Both the state Senate and Assembly are adjourned until Monday.

In a hearing that began Wednesday and stretched into the early morning hours Thursday, lawmakers peppered tourism officials and a representative from a firm partnering with the ball club with questions about the feasibility and benefits of financing such a deal.

Public funds for the stadium would mainly come from $180 million in transferable tax credits and $120 million in county bonds. Backers have pledged that the creation of a special tax district around the proposed stadium would generate enough money to pay off those bonds and interest. The plan would not directly raise taxes.

The A’s would not owe property taxes for the publicly owned stadium. Clark County, which includes Las Vegas, would also contribute $25 million in credit toward infrastructure costs.

A’s representatives and some tourism officials say a deal would further grow Las Vegas’ developing sports scene and act as an economic engine, but a growing chorus of economists and some lawmakers warn that the project would bring minimal benefits for the hefty public price tag.